Skip to main content
logo

CRRA 2022 Conference & Tradeshow

September 6–9, 2022

The Seabird Resort in Oceanside, CA

CRRA Annual Policy Round Table

Tuesday, September 6, 2022 at 2:30 PM–5:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
TBD

Speakers

Moderator

Welcome Reception

Tuesday, September 6, 2022 at 5:00 PM–7:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Terrace

Speakers

Moderator

Breakfast with Exhibitors

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 6:50 AM–7:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Terrace

Speakers

Moderator

Yoga with Tedd Ward

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 6:50 AM–7:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Registration Desk

Speakers

Moderator

Plenary Session

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 8:00 AM–10:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal

Speakers

Moderator

Break

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 10:00 AM–10:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

1383 Implementation Takes Infrastructure - The Sequel

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics

Session Description

Nine months into the implementation of SB 1383, this session will provide the audience with case studies of real-time progress being made on infrastructure development.

Speakers

Tom Koutroulis, Orange County Waste & Recycling
Title

Director

Speaker Abstract

Things are different now. The presentation of OC Waste & Recycling’s transformation and expansion of an essential public service to help address the impacts of SB1383 and augment the lack of local organics recycling infrastructure. Orange County, as the 3rd highest generator of waste and was once the largest user of PGM as ADC, is expanding its infrastructure from solely landfilling activities to resource recovery. A journey that started over 4 years to transform and expand to create local solutions for organics recycling and increase industry expertise. The presentation will share the beginnings, the challenges faced and met, the hurdles that were overcome, and future vision of the agency’s adventure to create a circular economy in organics.

Kawsar Vazifdar, Los Angeles County Public Works
Title

Associate Civil Engineer

Speaker Abstract

With the Senate Bill 1383 organic waste disposal reduction regulations taking effect this year, Los Angeles County is expanding its award-winning edible food recovery program, amending existing and developing new waste collection contracts, and adopting implementation and enforcement policies. Hundreds of new facilities are needed throughout the State of California to achieve the SB 1383 targets of reducing landfill disposal of organic waste and emissions of methane, a powerful climate pollutant 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide in regard to short-term atmospheric warming. Counties and cities are responsible for planning to ensure adequate infrastructure capacity to process their food waste, green waste, and other organic waste. Through InfrastructureLA and the Southern California Conversion Technology Project, Los Angeles County has been engaging local Cities, facility developers, waste haulers, and other stakeholders to prepare for SB 1383 compliance. This presentation will provide an overview of planning and implementation efforts that led the County to new insights and the development of new policies and programs. The presenter will also share lessons learned to help other jurisdictions implement similar strategies.

 

Chris Seney, Republic Services
Title

Director, Organics Operations

Speaker Abstract

Republic Services is a leading environmental services provider in the Country.  In California we operate six compost facilities, three organics preprocessing operations and multiple other organics operations throughout the state.  I will highlight all of our organics infrastructure and focus on our newest operations that opened in 2021.  This includes the solar powered Otay compost facility and two food waste preprocessing operations. 

Moderator

Neil Edgar, California Compost Coalition

Closing the Paint Loop in CA - Strength of Partnerships Drive Program's Decade of Success

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B
Track

Reuse

Session Description

As with many painting projects, latex paint is often purchased in greater quantities than needed. California's Paint Stewardship Program was developed to reduce, reuse, and recycle paint collected within the state. PaintCare celebrates 10 years of success, as an industry-led, statewide program that follows producer responsibility principles to reduce the generation of leftover paint, promote its reuse, and properly manage unwanted leftover paint. 

 PaintCare provides outreach to households and businesses with an effort to divert their unwanted, leftover paint to a PaintCare drop-off site instead of landfills. With over 834 year-round drop-off sites, partnerships with local paint retail stores, and household hazardous waste centers, over 29.3 million gallons of paint have been collected. Through PaintCare’s partnerships with Recyclers and Reuse Programs, the program has closed the loop on recycling paint.  

Moderated Carmen Zuniga, Program Director for ACTenviro. ACTenviro is a nationally-recognized environmental and hazardous waste management firm, one of the top 100 recyclers in the United States, servicing small businesses to local, state, and federal government agencies. This session will present a review of the last 10-years of success of the PaintCare California Program, and the future of the program, reuse, and recycled-content products within the paint industry.

Speakers

Nichole Dorr, PaintCare
Title

California Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

Nichole Dorr will present an overview of PaintCare’s California program to date. She will cover the successes of the program over the last 10 years; including the setup of over 820 year-round paint drop-off sites consisting of paint retailers, municipal household hazardous waste (HHW) facilities, solid waste transfer stations, and other voluntary locations to create a network of convenient paint drop-off points in California. The program provided access to a year-round site within 15 miles for 99% of the state’s population, exceeding the target of 90%. Over the last ten years, the program has collected over 29.3 million gallons of paint. Nichole will also review the program's increased community outreach activities, expansion of reuse efforts, and the recent fee decrease for consumers at point-of-purchase.

Lisa Thompson, Riverside County Department of Waste Resources
Title

Environmental Compliance Manager

Speaker Abstract

Lisa Thompson will talk about the progress and challenges associated with building a robust waste management system in Riverside County. Lisa will provide an overview of Riverside County’s permanent Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection Facilities, temporary HHW Events, community outreach programs like e-waste collection, appliance collection, mattress recycling, and the success of Riverside’s 5 Drop & Shop Reuse stores. Finally, Lisa will touch on how Riverside County’s partnership with PaintCare has successfully diverted paint from landfills to recycle it and provide a close loop to county residents with their reuse stores.

Jerry Noel, Visions
Title

CEO and Founder

Speaker Abstract

Jerry Noel of Visions Quality Paint will provide an overview of how his company recycles latex paint as a raw material to manufacture reuse paint products, retaining wall blocks, landscape stones, and parking stops for passenger and commercial vehicles. Jerry will discuss his partnership with PaintCare over the last 10-years. He will touch on the PaintCare grant that was awarded to Visions in 2021, to develop new methods of recycling latex paint that cannot be recycled back into reuse paint. Jerry will also discuss Visions lines of reuse paint, partnerships with Habitat for Humanity, and Wal-Mart. Finally, Jerry with share some insight on the future innovations of reuse paint products and the growth he expects to see in the industry.

Moderator

Carmen Zuniga, ACTenviro

Processes and Behavior - Combating Contamination

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B
Track

Potluck

Speakers

Moderator

Susan Collins, Container Recycling Institute

Strategies for Addressing Contamination - Results from a Nationwide Study

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Ann Gibbs, SERA
Title

Research Analyst

Speaker Abstract

A recently completed study on successful strategies in addressing contamination examined more than two dozen options.  The project examined “usual suspect” local choices related to program design, education, processing improvements and other options to identify those with the biggest impact and lowest cost.  In addition to case study information, detailed modeling work examines the tradeoffs from including and excluding specific materials and specific “advanced” processing technologies (robots, optical scanners, etc.) on diversion, costs and profitability, and how the results are affected by market prices and disposal fees.  The results of this study provide best practices to help communities and haulers make successful choices in cleaning up the recycling stream.

Moderator

San José Cart Lid Replacement Pilot Project Improves Recycling Behavior

Speakers

Jennie Loft, City of San Jose, Environmental Services Department
Title

Public Information Manager

Speaker Abstract

In spring 2021, the City of San José’s Environmental Services Department conducted a successful pilot program to improve residents’ recycling behavior by providing recycling cart lids with trilingual (English, Spanish and Vietnamese) labels showing what is recyclable and what isn’t. The program sampled recycling material from nearly 5,000 single-family homes along five collection routes in north and east San José where the graphic labels had been distributed. The contamination rates along those routes dropped by an average of 20 percent.

 In the conference workshop, the presenters will talk about:

 

  • Problem: Contaminated recyclable materials in recycling containers
  • Reaching Spanish and Vietnamese speaking audiences
  • Program Operations: Working with a hauler on how to deploy new cartlids w graphics
  • Visual graphics conveying what to recycle and what not to
  • San José’s major Recycle Right campaign
  • Results of the pilot program
  • Next Steps
Valerie Osmond, City of San Jose Environmental Services Department
Title

Deputy Director

Speaker Abstract

In spring 2021, the City of San José’s Environmental Services Department conducted a successful pilot program to improve residents’ recycling behavior by providing recycling cart lids with trilingual (English, Spanish and Vietnamese) labels showing what is recyclable and what isn’t. The program sampled recycling material from nearly 5,000 single-family homes along five collection routes in north and east San José where the graphic labels had been distributed. The contamination rates along those routes dropped by an average of 20 percent.

 In the conference workshop, the presenters will talk about:

 

  • Problem: Contaminated recyclable materials in recycling containers
  • Reaching Spanish and Vietnamese speaking audiences
  • Program Operations: Working with a hauler on how to deploy new cartlids w graphics
  • Visual graphics conveying what to recycle and what not to
  • San José’s major Recycle Right campaign
  • Results of the pilot program
  • Next Steps

Moderator

A First Glimpse – Using SB 1383 Route Reviews and Facility Audits to Reduce Contamination

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Tim Dewey-Mattia, Napa Recycling & Waste Services
Title

Recycling & Public Education Manager

Speaker Abstract

Contamination continues to be a hurdle for all of our recycling and composting programs.  As a hauler, recycler and composter, Napa Recycling deals with this at multiple levels of collection and processing. SB 1383 includes multiple requirements for regular route reviews and facility sampling audits, and Tim will give a first glimpse at how jurisdictions and haulers can use these SB 1383 flip-the-lid reviews and facility audits to help understand, monitor and reduce contamination.

Moderator

Two on Textiles - Endless Possibilities When Processes Are In Place

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

CVSan's Textile Collection Program

Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Speakers

Naomi Lue, Castro Valley Sanitary District
Title

Zero Waste Supervisor

Speaker Abstract

Castro Valley Sanitary District (CVSan) developed a curbside and event-based Textile Collection Program with its contractor, Alameda County Industries (ACI), upon the inception of their Franchise Agreement on May 1, 2019. The residential program consists of two Textile Collection Weeks, collection during Recycles Day events, and recovery from on-call curbside Bulky & Reuse Pick-Ups. Tonnages have far exceeded expectations of the program. Materials are processed and shipped to destinations domestically and in Central America for resale, reuse, and recycling. Attendees will learn how CVSan created its program for replication in their jurisdiction.

Moderator

Leaders in Textile Reuse and Recycling from Publicly Funded Pilots

Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Session Description

California’s textile waste stream is more complex than imagined. Publicly funded textile pilots share insight on the growing waste stream and challenges for creating a recovery program aligned with the waste hierarchy. Brand leaders have invested in siloed textile recycling initiatives, and need other brands and government to join in to scale the impact. Similarly, Goodwill sees opportunities to expand sorting and grading to add repair streams in their business model, as modeled by a pilot funded by the San Francisco Department of the Environment in partnership with the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC). CPSC leads four textile recovery pilots in the state to characterize commercial textile waste, model different models of collection, and expand their textile handlers database. Los Angeles has an opportunity, as a major global fashion market center, to grow as a sustainable fashion hub and LA SAN commits to leadership in this area.

 

Since 2020, CPSC has been hosting a Statewide Textile Recovery Advisory Committee who published a report for policy makers at every level of government, advocating to:

  1. Fund and protect the garment reuse and repair infrastructure ASAP;
  2. Lead by example with green purchasing and pollution prevention;
  3. Expand regional fiber production and manufacturing to support circular and healthy textile systems;
  4. Textile waste is a complex problem that can’t be solved on the public’s dime, so industry funding is mandatory to relieve the unfair cost-burden on charities, waste managers, and secondhand clothing markets, which disproportionately impact vulnerable communities.

Speakers

Michael Simpson, LA Sanitation
Title

Division Manager

Speaker Abstract

As the lead agency for the City’s environmental programs and initiatives, LA Sanitation (LASAN) protects public health and the environment through the administration and management of infrastructure programs collect, treat, recycle, and dispose the solid and liquid waste generated by the nation’s second largest city of more than four million residents. Los Angeles has an opportunity, as a major global fashion market center, to grow as a sustainable fashion hub and LA SAN commits to leadership in this area by funding pilot projects.

Linda Pratt, Goodwill
Title

Project Manager

Speaker Abstract

Goodwill of San Francisco, San Mateo, and Marin’s guiding principle is that everybody deserves a second chance—and everybody deserves access to training, job opportunities, and support to succeed in our economy. Goodwill collects post-consumer goods, including textiles and clothing, and sees opportunities to expand sorting and grading through new technologies, job creation, and strategic collaborations.

Joanne Brasch, California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC)
Title

Special Projects Manager

Speaker Abstract

The California Product Stewardship Council leads four textile recovery pilots in the state to characterize commercial textile waste, model different models of collection, and expand their textile handlers database. Textile waste is a complex problem that can’t be solved on the public’s dime, so industry funding is mandatory to relieve the unfair cost-burden on charities, waste managers, and secondhand clothing markets, which disproportionately impact vulnerable communities.

Moderator

Joanne Brasch, California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC)

Topic Lunches

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 12:15 PM–2:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Offsite/Various

Speakers

Moderator

CalRecycle Reporting Deep Dive

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 2:15 PM–3:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B
Track

Potluck

Speakers

Moderator

Leslie Lukacs, Zero Waste Sonoma

SB 1383 Compliance Pulse Check

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Emily Coven, Recyclist
Title

Founder, CEO

Speaker Abstract

It's T-minus less than a month until the new SB 1383-inclusive Electronic Annual Report is due... is your jurisdiction fully compliant, with all your records in order? Of course not, and you're not alone! But the good news for the state -- and the planet -- is that many jurisdictions have made significant progress so far in 2022. Pulling from aggregated and anonymized Recyclist Program Tracker data comprising nearly half of the jurisdictions in the state, you'll get insights into levels of compliance with the organics collection requirement. You'll also see stats on how jurisdictions on the whole are progressing with issuing waivers, identifying commercial edible food generators and tracking food recovery, meeting recovered organic waste product procurement targets, and conducting route reviews or waste evaluations. Along with other statistics, the numbers will paint a picture of how far we've already come in this collective effort to reduce short-lived climate pollutants, as well as what the road ahead may look like.

Moderator

CalRecycle Electronic Annual Report Q&A

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Andrew Parrish, CalRecycle
Title

Senior Environmental Scientist/EAR Lead

Speaker Abstract

CalRecycle staff will be available to answer questions on the restructured Electronic Annual Report (EAR), functionality of the system, and how to fill the report out.

 

Moderator

Foodware - Formulas for Success

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 2:15 PM–3:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B

Speakers

Moderator

Foodware Reduction Policies: Challenges and Opportunities

Track

Reuse

Session Description

Food and beverage packaging is an increasingly large part of the Calfiornia waste stream. Local jurisdictions and their haulers struggle to identify products and materials that can be handled in local recycling and compost systems and comply with state organics requirements. Meanwhile, communities demand solutions to the overwhelming problem of plastic pollution and our climate crisis. Single-use foodware is an increasing challenge. This session will dive into the challenges and potential solutions for single-use foodware and look further upstream to reuse policies and food service systems that can help solve these problems.

Speakers

Miriam Gordon, Upstream
Title

Policy Director

Speaker Abstract

Reduce and reuse policies in food service and bottled beverages are spreading even as communities and states grapple with a pandemic. In this presentation, you will get a policy update and overview. In addition, you will see a demonstration of our modeling tool for communities to assess the cost impacts of transitioning foodware to compostables versus reusables in different foodservice sectors.

Jessica Aldridge, Athens Services
Title

Director of Sustainability & Zero Waste Programs, TRUE cert.

Speaker Abstract

As a hauler and processor of recyclables and organics, it is vital to your infrastructure and diversion goals to receive items that benefit your bottom line and not the landfill.  Theoretically, compostable foodware provides less confusion and cleaner streams when it comes to sorting. However, state and federal regulations limit what types of foodware can and cannot be accepted at a compost facility, such as bioplastics. Recyclable foodware have their own set of challenges, from product types to confusion around contamination. While the markets for plastics #1 and #5 seem promising, but are these the best options? Is it possible to find disposable foodware that benefits the compost and recycling systems, as well as the environment and community?  We will explore the active role waste haulers can play in communicating to customers what material is best for their streams, why foodware is a vital part of the diversion conversation, and various foodware challenges and solutions

Maia Tekle, Dispatch Goods
Title

Head of Sales & Partnerships

Speaker Abstract

Communities all across California want solutions to waste and plastic pollution and increasingly recognize that the throw-away culture has to change if we are to solve these problems. But reuse solutions, especially in the take-out foodservice sector, are hard to imagine as there are so few examples. One company, Dispatch Goods, is growing a reuse service for take-out that works for businesses and customers. Here you will learn about the keys to their success, including how they have evolved over time to make their service fun and convenient. They are even providing takeback and reuse services for problematic waste products, like cooler packs. No trip is wasted in the Dispatch Goods model. Learn about this fantastic service and how to bring it to your community.

Moderator

Jack Macy, SF Department of the Environment

Tackling Single-Use Foodware in a Small Town

Track

Reuse

Speakers

Melanie Conti, Town of Truckee
Title

Administrative Analyst I

Speaker Abstract

The Town of Truckee began embarking on the process to develop a single-use foodware reduction ordinance in August 2019. As a tourist destination located in the Sierra Nevadas just outside of Lake Tahoe, Truckee is known for its outdoor beauty and outdoor enthusiasts. With issues arising around litter and the prevalence of single-use foodware, the community spoke up about concerns and in February 2020, Truckee Town Council officially directed staff to develop a working group to develop a single-use foodware ordinance. We all know what happened after that. Staff took a long pause in the ordinance process from March 2020 until late 2021 when they felt the business community could engage in the process again. In December 2021, Town staff restarted the ordinance process by developing a working group of various stakeholders to develop policy recommendations to Town Council for the summer of 2022. Policy considerations included a ban on Polystyrene, requiring reusable foodware for in-house dining, and a fee on disposable foodware. The working group, consisting of members of the public, business owners, and environmental advocates, also helped Town staff identify an implementation and outreach plan. Truckee's policies focus on a cultural shift from single-use to reusable foodware, and show that small cities can make a big impact in waste prevention. Truckee's ordinance process provides a template for engaging the public around single-use foodware policies and can offer jurisdictions across the state with a framework for developing foodware reduction policies in the era of Covid-19. 

Moderator

SB1383 Compliance Using a Mixed Waste (HDOPF) Processing Approach

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 2:15 PM–3:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics

Session Description

The session will cover technical considerations relating to complying with SB1383 using a high diversion organic processing facilities (HDOPF) approach. Speakers will present the regulatory requirements for HDOPFs, how different waste companies in northern and southern California are sorting MSW to extract organics, and how food waste is then used to produce green-energy and compost products.  With a focus on providing guidance in program and policy design, attendees will learn about specific technologies used deployed to sort organics, the economic savings of not adding dedicated organics collection routes, and the benefits and drawbacks of sorting organics from MSW verses a source separated program approach.

Speakers

Yaniv Scherson, Anaergia
Title

COO

Speaker Abstract

Organics sorted from MSW has higher contamination than organics from source separated collection programs.  Anaerobic digestion offers a cost-effective solution for handling MSW organics and can extract energy from the materials and produce a compost product.  Key technologies that can remove contamination from MSW organics are essential.  The quality concerns of MSW organics, the cleaning technologies available to prepare the organics for anaerobic digestion, new and existing digestion infrastructure, and the quality of the final compost product will be discussed.

Robert Hilton, HF&H Consultants, LLC
Title

President

Speaker Abstract

This presentation will provide an overview of SB 1383 requirements related to HDOWPF. The overview will include identification of the types of organic waste collection systems for which HDOWPFs must be utilized and will explain SB 1383’s 50% and 75% organic waste recovery standards for HDOWPFs.  In addition, the presentation will include a summary of the quarterly SB 1383 material sampling and measurement requirements for the HDOWPFs, which must be conducted by the facility operator to determine the facility’s compliance with the organic waste recovery standards and incompatible materials limits.  HDOWPF recordkeeping and reporting requirements will be reviewed as well as consequences for a facility’s failure.

Coby Skye, County of Los Angeles DPW
Title

Assist Deputy Manager

Speaker Abstract

SB1383 provides two compliance approaches to diverting organics from landfill, source separated organics collection or sorting organics from MWS by using a high diversion organics processing facility (HDOPF).  This presentation will provide a survey the many companies in southern California that have implemented HDOPF to meet 1383 compliance.  Specifically, data on the processing technologies, the economics of MWS processing for 1383 compliance, and the secondary processing approach of composting or anaerobic digestion for each facility will be discussed. 

Hilary Gans, South Bayside Waste Management Authority
Title

Senior Operations & Engineering Manager

Speaker Abstract

GSB1383 provides two compliance approaches to diverting organics from landfill, source separated organics collection or sorting organics from MWS by using a high diversion organics processing facility (HDOPF).  This presentation will provide a survey the many companies in northern California that have implemented HDOPF to meet 1383 compliance.  Specifically, data on the processing technologies, the economics of MWS processing for 1383 compliance, and the secondary processing approach of composting or anaerobic digestion for each facility will be discussed. 

Moderator

Hilary Gans, SBWMA

The Ultimate Outcome - Making Music While Recycling the Urban Forest

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 2:15 PM–3:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A
Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Session Description

“The ultimate outcome, making music while recycling the urban forest”. How two for-profit companies came together during the pandemic to create a musical win, win while bringing to life a 3-decade effort of Cal-Fire’s Urban Forestry Program. An Urban Wood Network and movement is born.

Speakers

Walter Passmore, CAL FIRE
Title

State Urban Forester, Resource Protection & Improvement

Speaker Abstract

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection is a department of the California Natural Resources Agency. It is responsible for fire protection in various areas under state responsibility totaling 31 million acres, as well as the administration of the state's private and public forests. In addition, the department provides varied emergency services in 36 of the state's 58 counties via contracts with local governments. Join Cal Fire’s state urban forester as he discusses the organization’s urban forestry grant projects which have helped implement urban wood recycling policies throughout various municipalities. Learn about what impact recycling urban wood has on climate change as a critical tool to mitigating environmental impacts while also improving the health of local urban forests & the community.  Project examples will include mulch utilization for water conservation, wood biomass for energy and biochar generation, and creation of lumber and durable products from urban trees.  Local use, reuse, limiting transportation, carbon capture, serving disadvantaged/low-income communities, and environmental health are recurring goals for all projects.

Scott Paul, Taylor Guitars
Title

Director of Natural Resource Sustainability

Speaker Abstract

Through the powerhouse partnership between West Coast Arborists, inc., a family-owned tree maintenance & management provider, & Taylor Guitars, the world-renowned guitar manufacturer they are reimagining the traditional wood materials supply chain through the urban wood initiative. Around the world, municipalities struggle to maintain urban tree cover and cost effectively remove city trees at the end of their lives. Traditionally these trees are removed, chipped, mulched, or landfilled at taxpayer expense. To address these issues, WCA & Taylor Guitars launched an urban wood campaign to make high-quality guitars using instrument-grade wood species like Shamel ash, with more species actively planned. Learn about the urban wood campaign and our vision to create a new economic model that builds municipal infrastructure, grows the urban canopy, creates jobs & supports a more sustainable “farm-to-table” approach to making guitars and other products.

John Mahoney, Street Tree Revival
Title

Manager, Urban Wood

Speaker Abstract

25 years ago, West Coast Arborists, Inc., (WCA) started an urban wood recycling program in collaboration with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF). Since a number of trees living within our City streets and parks eventually decline and require removal it became imperative to identify ways to salvage what we could. All trees have a life cycle, so we are making every effort to save the trees we can from ending up in landfills. When trees need to be removed from the Urban Forest, we preserve their natural beauty and also limit carbon emissions by salvaging trees lost during storms, disease, or normal senescence and recycling this wood into usable raw lumber. Our urban wood offers a story unlike any other, as they’ve been salvaged from our streets… A true Street Tree Revival. In this presentation we will introduce you to recycling from the contractor perspective as an alternative to dumping, means of eliminating waste, & its success as a revenue generating stream utilizing the principles of a closed-loop system, which aim to keep it local. We will also discuss the longstanding partnership with developing the Urban Wood Network (UWN) and accomplishments in wood utilization. The UWN is a rapidly growing collective of members and their efforts to launch local networks, demonstration projects, and educational programs to get industry members connected and customers interested in urban wood.

Moderator

Andrew Trotter, Urban Wood Network

Break

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 3:45 PM–4:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

Exploring Alternative Fuels

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 4:00 PM–5:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B

Speakers

Moderator

Tracie Bills, SCS Engineers

The Transition to Zero Emission Fleets

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Veronica Pardo, Resource Recovery Coalition of California
Title

Regulatory Affairs Director

Speaker Abstract

To combat climate change, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is developing a heavy-duty (Class 2b – Class 8) zero-emission fleet regulation with the goal of achieving zero-emission fleets by 2045 everywhere feasible. This presentation will address how the Advanced Clean Fleets (ACF) regulation will impact both private and public solid waste fleets, especially as we look to meet new organic waste recycling obligations under SB 1383.

Zero emission vehicles are defined as battery electric or fuel cell electric powered by hydrogen. As initially drafted, high-priority private solid waste fleets will need to demonstrate that 10% of their refuse vehicles are zero emission in 2027, 25% in 2030, 50% in 2033, 75% in 2036, and 100% by 2039. Meanwhile, new fleet truck purchases for public fleets will need to be 50% zero emission from 2024 to 2027 and 100% from 2027 onward, except for certain low populations counties exempted from the first phase. The initial draft also provides flexibility for the purchase of near-zero emission vehicles, which are hybrids, through 2035.

Attendees will learn what the current ACF regulations propose for public and private fleets, including anticipated phase-in schedules, vehicle considerations, applicable definitions, infrastructure development, and available funding, as well as how they can get involved in the regulations and voice concerns. Attendees will also hear how the waste and recycling industry is looking to find an alternative compliance pathway for solid waste vehicles fueled by renewable natural gas derived from organics, aligning with SB 1383 organic waste recycling expectations.

Moderator

Electric vs. RNG Fleets

Track

Potluck

Speakers

John Carlton, HDR
Title

Professional Associate, Solid Waste Program Lead

Speaker Abstract

To come.

Moderator

Using RNG from AD & Navigating SB 1383 and CARB

Track

Potluck

Speakers

Teresa Montgomery, South San Francisco Scavenger Company
Title

Sustainability Director

Speaker Abstract

To come.

Moderator

Lessons Learned on Handling Hard to Dispose Waste

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 4:00 PM–5:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

Richard Anthony, Richard Anthony

Best Practices in Addressing Illegal Dumping of Durable Waste

Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Speakers

Calvin Lakhan, York University
Title

Professor, Ph.D.

Speaker Abstract

Illegal dumping of durable waste (like auto parts, household appliances, mattresses, furniture, construction and home renovation waste, and electronics) is different from littering and requires distinct prevention and mitigation strategies.

To help policymakers and other stakeholders better understand the significant environmental, economic and societal harms that illegal dumping creates (both where the dumping occurs and in surrounding communities), this presentation identifies drivers of illegal dumping and explores public policy options to address the problem.

Moderator

Using Barrier/Benefit Research to Develop Outreach Strategies that Address Abandoned Waste

Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Speakers

Joey Schmitt, Action Research
Title

Director

Speaker Abstract

In this session, we will explain how a data-driven, behavior-based model was used for developing effective outreach aimed at reducing abandoned waste. After identifying specific target behaviors, we conducted barrier-benefit research that identified the outreach materials, strategies, and tools needed for the abandoned waste programs in the City of Palmdale and County of San Diego. Reducing abandoned waste directly impacts water quality and may also reduce the costs of doing site cleanups. Therefore, this presentation was organized to provide valuable behavior-based insights to program planners.

The County of San Diego Watershed Protection Program embarked on a behavior-based trash pilot study focused on reducing abandoned waste in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. The County chose to follow the community-based social marketing (CBSM) approach, a research-driven process grounded in the social and behavioral sciences. CBSM involves five steps: (1) strategically selecting behaviors, (2) identifying the barriers and benefits to the selected behaviors, (3) developing strategies that reduce the barriers to the behaviors to be promoted while simultaneously enhancing the benefits, and (4) piloting the strategies, and (5) broadly implementing the effective strategies.

Selection of specific waste items for a pilot were determined via conversations with code compliance, community advocates, and waste haulers. A literature review was conducted to determine proper disposal method options and common considerations for the proper disposal of common items. To build upon this initial research, a mail survey was conducted with 800 randomly selected households.

To address the identified barriers and benefits to proper disposal, a suite of materials was developed. A flyer and a door hanger were created and tailored for single- and multi-family living situations. Behavior change tools were infused throughout the materials including highlighting social norms, setting the County up as a helper, capturing attention, goal setting, and commitments. The materials were designed to be flexible so that they could be easily distributed during times with a high potential for waste abandonment. The multi-family materials were designed to integrate smoothly into the move-out process. The research process provided important insights into how to design and develop needed outreach targeting abandoned waste in communities across San Diego.

The City of Palmdale is the sixth most populous city in Los Angeles County and the second largest geographically, with upwards of 150,000 residents spread throughout an area covering more than 100 square miles. Low population densities coupled with large undeveloped open spaces that are adjacent to residential areas has created an environment primed for illegal dumping of bulk waste.

A web-based survey and literature review were conducted as the foundation for development of citywide outreach strategies. The campaign included: (1) a landing page on the City of Palmdale’s website highlighting proper disposal options; (2) a vehicle wrap for Palmdale’s lightning loader featuring the campaign’s tagline and a QR code/link to the landing page; and (3) twelve social media posts promoting the proper disposal of mattresses and other bulk waste items for use on the City of Palmdale’s social media channels.

Moderator

Addressing Illegal Dumping and Waste Issues Related to the Unhoused: Sacramento County’s Approach During Turbulent Times

Track

HHW/Hard to Dispose

Speakers

Timothy Israel, County of Sacramento Department of Waste Management & Recycling
Title

Superintendent of Technical Services

Speaker Abstract

To come.

Moderator

Reuse & Repair: Progress, Challenges & Solutions Toward Zero Waste

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 4:00 PM–5:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B
Track

Reuse

Session Description

This panel will cover the opportunities, rules, and progress in the Reuse and Repair areas of the Three Rs, which sit high up in the zero waste hierarchy. Panelists from several regions in California will discuss legislation, explore successful entrepreneurial and non-profit actions and enterprises, with ample time following the discussion for feedback, updates, and Q&A. Attendees will clearly learn why Reuse and Repair are essential first steps in the Circular Economy, and understand the essential efforts that are needed to achieve it.

Speakers

John Davis, Mojave Desert and Mountain Recycling Authority
Title

Administrator

Speaker Abstract

The Federal Trade Commission released a report to Congress that concluded that manufacturers use a variety of methods that have made consumer products harder to fix and maintain, increasing burdens on consumers, and restricting competition for repairs. The Report found that “although manufacturers have offered numerous explanations for their repair restrictions, the majority are not supported by the record.”

On November 2021 Apple “announced Self-Service Repair, which will allow customers who are comfortable with completing their own repairs access to Apple genuine parts and tools.” Kyle Wiens, iFixit’s Founder and CEO, responded that “all of the reasons not to pass right to repair have sort of been negated by this announcement. Apple's saying consumers can make repairs safely if they have the right information." 

As part of a comprehensive Circular Economy law, France began requiring “reparability ratings” for designated products starting in 2021, and a “durability rating” starting in 2024. The manufacturers must display ratings calculated using five measures: ease of repairability, price of spare parts, availability of spare parts, availability of repair documentation and a final measure that varies depending on the type of device.

Establishing Right to Repair is foundational to asserting that waste prevention activities take precedence in policy and practice to recycling or disposal. The Statewide Commission adopted a recommendation that the Legislature enact Right to Repair and repair labeling. Previous Right to Repair legislation died in committee under industry lobbying efforts. A legislative update including State and regional legislation will be included in this presentation.

 

Richard Anthony, Zero Waste San Diego
Title

President

Speaker Abstract

This year, a major focus of national discard management conferences has been on Reuse and Repair as part of the closed circle economy.  Markets for fiber, metal, and a few plastic resins have recovered and are sold on the global market instead of ending up in landfills. A significant amount of these discards that are ending up in landfills can be reused, repaired and/or recycled.  Programs and laws are now addressing this procedure.

This presentation will have a look at reuse and repair groups throughout the State and their activities that are occurring in Southern California.

As we work on technical and organic cycles, reuse and recovery are a key first action. Preventing and recovering wasted food, as well as furniture, textiles, and concrete programs apply to both residents and commercial generators, are all part of what is happening. Fix-it clinics, tool-lending libraries, and edible food recovery programs are gaining the public’s attention.

Max Wechsler, Urban Ore, Inc.
Title

Operations Manager

Speaker Abstract

In 2019, Urban Ore’s gross revenue had been stuck at $2.6M for a decade. As costs continued to rise, things weren’t looking too good. Then the pandemic happened. In 2021, the company grossed $3.5M. How did this happen? Max will present on the challenges and opportunities that COVID has created for the reuse retail industry, including how being a for-profit has helped grow Urban Ore’s success. He will also touch upon the trailblazing salvage service contract that the company has renewed with the City of Berkeley, and explore how reuse recovery centers are a necessary element of a thriving community and zero waste efforts. 

Jasmine Falstitch, East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse
Title

Executive Director

Speaker Abstract

In March 2020, the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse, a 40 year-old non-profit, laid off all its employees and shuttered its doors for 11 months. During that time, the long-time Executive Director retired and the Board of Directors realized something drastic would need to change if this valued institution were to survive. While the Depot was once a thriving and forward-thinking organization, the new director soon discovered it was failing financially and struggling to remain relevant. Among the further challenges were being in the middle of a pandemic, a boycott by former employees, and a rapid loss of donors and customers to Buy Nothing groups, NextDoor Free and a plethora of other resale sites. In this session, attendees will learn how the Depot pivoted from being a second-hard store to a community resource for reuse and repair. Where we failed, what we are currently trying, and where we hope to be in the years to come will all be explored. 

Moderator

Christienne de Tournay Birkhahn, Zero Waste USA

SB 1383 Compliance and Progress

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 4:00 PM–5:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics

Session Description

SB 1383 is one of the most significant changes in our solid waste world in the past 30 years.  This law will help fight climate change by having organic waste generators take action now which will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and also help feed hungry Californians by creating an edible food goal.  The SB 1383 regulations went into effect on January 1, 2022.

Our speakers will give an update on SB 1383 compliance and progress.  You will hear firsthand from entities on their own progress to become compliant with SB 1383 and how some have used the SB 619 and Corrective Action Plan process to ensure their overall compliance.  You will also hear from CalRecycle on how they have worked with entities to become compliant as well as the enforcement process.

Speakers

Ashlee Yee, CalRecycle
Title

Environmental Program Manager II - Branch Chief

Speaker Abstract

SB 1383 has many components to it and to successfully reach our statewide goals, a general understanding of SB 1383 is necessary.  Ashlee will present a broad overview of SB 1383, including what the goals are, why they are important, and what do the regulations say to help reach our goals.  She will cover organics collection, capacity planning, edible food, procurement, reporting, and compliance.  Attendees will learn the general aspects of SB 1383 and how the regulations will help us succeed.

Kevin Miller, City of Napa
Title

Materials Diversion Administrator (Recycling Manager)

Speaker Abstract
Rene Guerrero, City of Pomona
Title

Public Works Director

Speaker Abstract

Moderator

Cara Morgan, CalRecyle

Reception with Exhibitors

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 5:30 PM–7:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

Trash Monologues

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 at 9:00 PM–11:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
The Library

Speakers

Moderator

Breakfast with Exhibitors

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 7:00 AM–7:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

Beach Clean-up

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 7:00 AM–8:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Colleen Foster, City of Oceanside
Title
Speaker Abstract

Take Action: Climate, Resilience, and Reducing Our Footprint Presentation and Beach Clean Up  7am to 8:30am– Oceanside Pier – Across the street from Seabird

Meet in Seagaze A and we'll walkl as a group to the Pier.

Hosted by City of Oceanside Green Oceanside team; Oceanside Lifeguards; Visit Oceanside; Surfrider; and other local environmental groups.  Supplies and light refreshments would be provided by the Green Oceanside team, with a guided host/talk by Lifeguard Chief (litter, tourism, solutions, changing coastal environment); Visit Oceanside (Green Tourism); Surfrider (litter, policy, climate change and clean ups). 

Moderator

Senate Bill 54

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 8:30 AM–9:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

Bottle Bill Discussion

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 9:00 AM–9:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

Edible Food Recovery: Lessons Learned and Prepping for Tier 2

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 9:30 AM–11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics / Edible Food Recovery

Session Description

The CRRA Edible Food Recovery Technical Council presents an informative session about lessons learned in the implementation of SB1383 requirements for Tier 1 commercial edible food generators and preparing for the implementation of recovery programs for Tier 2 commercial edible food generators. Presenters will dive into the nuances of recovery programs for Tier 2 commercial edible food generators including existing funding programs, reporting best practices and challenges, and specific solutions in rural counties. Attendees will gain an understanding of the various funding models seen throughout the state, the unintended consequences experienced in 2021, reporting requirements, the current and future obstacles rural counties face, and how to plan for successful Tier 2 edible food recovery implementation. This panel will present case studies and trends in implementation efforts across the state while highlighting the importance of preparation for Tier 2 implementation.

Speakers

Monica White, Edgar & Associates, Inc.
Title

Sustainability Manager

Speaker Abstract

In her role at Edgar and Associates, Monica has worked with numerous counties on strategies to fund food recovery programs to achieve sustainability goals and SB1383 compliance. The audience will learn about different funding models we are seeing through the state, their advantages and challenges with each of these funding models, lessons learned and unexpected consequences. We will discuss navigating the tier system defined by SB1383; and how a global pandemic has affected SB1383 compliance planning and implementation for the public, private and nonprofit sectors. Food recovery from Tier 2 generators requires different logistics than food recovery from Tier 1 where increased effort and infrastructure is needed to develop compliant programs. Planning for Tier 2 food recovery should begin as soon as possible. Monica will share key findings and lessons learned from her experiences customizing strategies for a variety of stakeholders. She will also explain the urgency and importance of strategic planning and funding for Tier 2 food recovery programs.

Cassie Bartholomew, StopWaste
Title

Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

Cassie will address some of the challenges, opportunities, and best practices StopWaste has developed through their extensive work engaging a variety of stakeholders from environmental health to food recovery organizations, in meeting the reporting requirements for SB1383 implementation. She will also explore planning for Tier 2 food waste generators and the lessons learned about reporting for Tier 1 generators. The audience will gain a greater understanding of the importance of engaging stakeholders to build trust and ensure accurate reporting, the nuances of SB 1383 reporting from different types of recovery organizations, and scenarios, the establishment of effective metrics, and the ability to create change and elevate standards through data.

Lisa Coelho, Recyclist
Title

Customer Success Manager

Speaker Abstract

Lisa Coelho, Customer Success Manager at Recyclist, will present trends non-urban communities are facing with implementing food recovery programs for Tier 2 generators. The challenges these communities face is unique and leave them vulnerable to non-compliance. These include limited funding, inadequate structural support, restricted access to resources, logistical gaps, and fewer non-profit organizations available to recover food. Local government representatives are identifying capacity gaps but struggling to identify approaches for capacity expansion. Although some rural communities are exploring software solutions that connect donors directly to recipients, this model yields a different set of challenges for Tier 2 food recovery. Specifically, the logistics of sourcing volunteers to travel long distances to collect and redistribute small quantities of edible food from a Tier 2 generator requires a significant investment of resources for a small return. Through case studies and barrier and benefit analysis, the audience will take away innovative capacity expansion strategies and recommendations applicable to non-urban food recovery program development and implementation.

Moderator

David Hott, Loaves & Fishes Family Kitchen

Gamification and Partnership Models that Drive Adoption

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 9:30 AM–11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

Cecile Carson, Carson Consulting

SB1383 Compliance in K-12 Schools Must Involve the School District

Track

Schools

Speakers

Jill Buck, M.S., Ed. , Go Green Initiative
Title

Founder & CEO

Speaker Abstract

Individual schools do not have the authority and resources to fully comply with SB 1383 without the involvement of their school district leadership. Waste hauling contracts, labor issues, and volume purchasing power rests at the District level. Asking every school to advocate to their District for support is inefficient and often unsustainable once a school champion for SB 1383 leaves the campus.

In this session we will discuss tried-and-true best practices in developing a District-level Green Team that is optimized to provide school sites with the resources and support needed to successfully, and sustainably, institutionalize SB 1383. The speaker will discuss case studies from both Pleasanton Unified and Compton Unified School Districts, and will share templates that the audience can take back to their communities to replicate these success stories.

Audience members will learn who should serve on the District Green Team, and the function of each member. This session will also cover the relationship between the District Green Team and School Site Green Team, and how to clearly define the role of each. Attendees will receive templates for slides, meeting agendas, training materials, and printed materials that can be customized for any community.

Moderator

Wally Waste-Not Changing the Game

Track

Schools

Speakers

Estela Gutierrez, Salinas Valley Recycles
Title

Resource Recovery Technician II

Speaker Abstract

Salinas Valley Recycles had a problem reaching and maintaining a presence in our 117 schools over 20 different districts.  This presentation will cover how the Wally Waste-Not Award program came to be and the hurdles we've overcome through the years for it to be a sustainable program.  COVID and 1383 implementation changed the game, but we have a vision for the future of Wally Waste-Not and it will be bright.  

Janna this, Salinas Valley Recycles
Title

Recycling Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

Learning from over a decade of school outreach, SVR created a streamline school food waste implementation plan.  Our first big success included a school with over 800 students switching to reusable sporks, implementing food scrap diversion, and food recovery on campus.  Through the implementation we were able to learn and grown and build a program with clearly defined steps for a campus to follow to achieve success.  We created training videos for custodial staff and students. Campus administrators complete the initial pre-implementation plans and once completed our staff attend two days of implementation to ensure success at the schools.  Join us for a discussion on what has worked, highlights of school success and where we still need improvement. 

Moderator

Using Local Policy to Rebuild the Soil and Sequester Carbon

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 9:30 AM–11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B
Track

Policy

Session Description

Carbon sequestration can actually reverse the impacts of climate change. According to some experts like 4p1000, The Rodale Institute and Rattan Lal, soil carbon sequestration could potentially more than offset all global emissions.

This panel will present the concepts and practices of carbon sequestration and regenerative agriculture and describe what communities can do next to implement these strategies locally. Fundamentally changing land management on millions or billions of acres will require a concerted effort spanning policy and the food economy and waste management systems currently in place. The good news is that whether it’s 50% or 100% of the solution, we can restore the climate and grow better food by taking collective action to systematically scale regenerative practices like compost application and cover crop planting.

The even better good news is that cities can use their SB 1383 procurement requirement to support regenerative agriculture and help to meet their climate goals. Beginning January 1, 2022, SB 1383 requires cities and counties to procure annually a quantity of recovered organic waste products to meet their annual procurement target (0.08 tons per capita per year). That's a lot of compost and many cities don't know where to put it. By partnering with farmers and ranchers outside of their boundaries, cities can meet the targets of SB 1383 and save the world from climate disaster.

 

Speakers

Anthony Myint, Zero Foodprint
Title

Executive Director

Speaker Abstract

California jurisdictions have a unique opportunity to using their procurement dollars to save the world from the threats of global warming.
SB1383 targets a 75% reduction in organic matter in landfill by 2025 as well as requiring jurisdictions to procure compost to bolster the expanding market.
● According to CalRecycle and leading bio-geo-chemists, the sequestration from the diversion of organic matter from SB1383 could sequester over 3M tons of CO2e per year via carbon farming.
● 75% of ZFP’s grant projects involve compost application. We are uniquely suited to direct capital to carbon farming.
● Not all compost or projects are created equal so optimization is a massive climate and fiscal opportunity.
● ZFP is in discussion to become a Direct Service Provider with 6 counties to facilitate procurement/carbon farming.
ZFP businesses send 1% of sales. Many restaurants accomplish this at $0 cost by
adding a simple opt-out fee. A 1% contribution from the CA restaurant industry
would generate $970M per year (pre-COVID).
Since January 2020, ZFP has awarded over $550K to 31 carbon farming projects, expected to remove 18,000 tons of CO2e from the atmosphere. This is equivalent to not burning 2M gallons of gas!

At this session you will learn how to move mountains of compost and reduce the impacts of climate change.

Calla Rose Ostrander, Phoenix Rising Resources, LLC
Title

Strategic Advisor

Speaker Abstract

Phoenix Rising Resources was the lead author of the Carbon Sequestion Process Guide, funded by the Urban Sustainability Directors Network and sponsored by the cities of San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Boulder, Fayetteville and Cleveland.

The Process Guide was developed to catalyze a fundamental shift in the way municipalities manage their “waste” – particularly valuable organic materials. The guide will support cities in creating and initiating processes to transition from a linear, top-down system of organics waste management to an integrated, regenerative system that enhances soil and water quality, food access, and community health and well-being. This guide will help your city transition away from systems that direct organic materials to landfills, incinerators, or digesters, and create systems that ensure their highest and best use by re-visioning them as resources to sequester carbon, replenish soil, and strengthen communities.

The Process Guide has Six Sections

1. Organic Materials, Types and Volumes
2. Processing Infrastructure, Locations and Capacity
3. Internal Team and Community Stakeholders
4. Related Policies, Plans, and Contracts
5. Assessing Application Potential
6. Articulating Community and Environmental Benefits

These provide the basic data and processes you will need to have in place in order to explore redesigning your organics processing system. This presentation will introduce the guide and help to direct your to resources for redesigning your municipal organic materials systems for climate & community resilience & equitable economic diversification.

 

Kevin Drew, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Title

Special Zero Waste Projects Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

San Francisco has spent the past 25 years pursuing its Zero Waste strategy for the climate emergency. A key component has been city mandated organics collection to create compost for carbon sequestration. San Francisco is pursuing compost use beyond urban landscapes for potential SB 1383 application. Zero Waste is the key to net zero emissions by increasing source separation, especially organics & shrinking trash. An early estimate of potential GHG reduction from SF’s use of compost for soil carbon sequestration suggests significant impact: 50% drawdown by 2035 and 180% by 2050. In 2035, the cumulative total of carbon dioxide sequestered by by applying compost to rangeland will drawdown 50% of the City's emissions. By 2040, the sequestration will get San Francisco to carbon neutrality and by 2050 it will exceed San Francisco's emissions by 80% and actually be an engine for reversing climate change. All this can be done by just using the kitchen compost pail and separating organics from trash. Simple!

Moderator

Ruth Abbe, Global Recycling Council of CRRA

When More is More: Surplus Building Products Reduction and Redistribution

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 9:30 AM–11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B
Track

C&D

Session Description

In San Francisco, building materials represent about half of all municipal solid waste generation and approximately a quarter of all disposal. Reuse is an obvious strategy to address generation reduction and disposal to landfill, but it is currently complicated to implement. Typically, reuse is associated with items rescued from existing buildings (i.e., salvage), but that is not the sole source. Another feedstock for reuse is surplus, which is different from salvage because it is a product that has been purchased for construction but not installed. Surplus items are often pristine, well-documented, and new-in-box, so may be a gentler initiation to reuse principles and have a greater potential for market absorption. This session will summarize findings from the San Francisco Surplus Building Products Reduction and Redistribution Study, which offers insights about situations that lead to surplus on construction sites, including building product types, quantities, and frequency, as well as ways to minimize and repurpose these items. Panelists will explain two principal paths for addressing surplus: minimizing the amount of excess items generated in the first place; and determining alternate uses for the items that have been designed, manufactured, and transported to the jobsite rather than send them to landfill. We will also share some opportunities for local government to amplify synergies to drive the greatest benefit. The primary goal of the session is to supplement the considerations of an individual, organization, or project team working to achieve zero waste goals for construction.

Speakers

Kena David, BCCI Construction
Title

Director of Sustainability, Wellness, & ESG

Speaker Abstract

As a member of the Bay Area Sustainable Construction Leaders group, both panelists have focused on understanding the impact of construction waste generated as a result of building demolition and construction in San Francisco. Working with SF Department of the Environment to help quantify excess materials that could be diverted from the landfill has lead the BASCL group to some best practices and optimizations for both demolition and construction. The main perspective Kena will be offering as a part of this discussion is focused on the tenant improvement and renovations/alterations’ demolition and construction projects.  She will also share tips and best practices for salvaging material before and during demolition, which is typically self-performed at BCCI. Kena will also share some successful examples of working upstream with design teams for design-build project in order to reach goals for material reuse, reclaimed, and salvaged material installation. Not only does this reduce the amount of building waste contributed to the landfill but it also reduces the overall embodied carbon of a build.

Tolga Tutar, Skanska USA Building
Title

Sustainability Director

Speaker Abstract

As a member of the Bay Area Sustainable Construction Leaders group, both panelists have focused on understanding the impact of construction waste generated as a result of building demolition and construction in San Francisco. Working with SF Department of the Environment to help quantify excess materials that could be diverted from the landfill has led the BASCL group to some best practices and optimizations for both demolition and construction.

The main perspective Tolga will be offering as a part of this discussion is focused on the ground up new construction projects. Between now and 2060 the world’s population is expected to be doubling the amount of building floor-space, equivalent to building an entire New York City every month for 40 years. Therefore, the new construction projects that do not have the resources, tools and expertise to reducing surplus and finding new uses for surplus assets, and that do not properly address this issue early in the process, will be significantly contributing to this ever-growing problem on resource efficiency, waste and embodied carbon. Tolga will discuss the findings from the San Francisco Surplus Building Products Reduction and Redistribution Study from a general contractor perspective and share insights with the participants about the typical reasons for surplus, strategies to address surplus and achieve zero waste goals for ground up new construction projects. He will also share tips and best practices with a focus on common surplus assets for new construction projects such as surplus concrete, steel, brick, wood, and excavated soil.

Moderator

Kat Hanrahan, San Francisco Department of the Environment

Plenary Session and CPSC Awards Ceremony

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 11:15 AM–1:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal

Speakers

Moderator

Lunch with Exhibitors

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 1:15 PM–2:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Terrace

Speakers

Moderator

CRRA Annual Members Meeting

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 1:45 PM–2:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B

Speakers

Moderator

Driving Sustainability in the National School District

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 2:45 PM–4:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A
Track

Schools

Session Description

Too often, underserved schools and communities do not receive the resources needed to adequately inform residents of pollution mitigation strategies and pressing climate change issues. In schools located in Environmental Justice (EJ) communities many schools do not even have a coherent recycling program, which is typically one of the gateway programs to school and community sustainability.  

When schools begin to embrace and master initial "green" measures like recycling, it opens the door to other sustainability best practices. Students, teachers and administrators all gain confidence in making the system changes needed to reduce waste while at the same time celebrate hitting impressive benchmarks. Most schools cut their waste in half just by implementing a robust recycling program.

This session will follow the journey of National School District on its path to becoming a green school district. National City is a vulnerable community whose residents experience disproportionate exposure to harmful pollutants and as a result face significant health challenges.  In 2018, the administration of the National School District decided to focus on driving up school sustainability. Despite their efforts being interrupted by a global pandemic, the District has managed to accomplish major changes to the school culture and continues to improve on their sustainability efforts each year.

Speakers

Camille Sowinski, BCK Programs
Title

Managing Partner

Speaker Abstract

Camille will discuss how National School District started on their path toward sustainability. Atendees will hear the early efforts to motivate students, staff and administrators. She'll then introduce two Principals from the school district who have been instrumental in ensuring the initial stewardship efforts continue and who are committed to keep improving every year. 

 

Alfonso Denegri , Palmer Way Elementary School
Title

Principal

Speaker Abstract

Alfonso will recount his experience being one of the first champions within his school district to embrace more sustainable best practices. He'll explain how he was able to work with students and staff to make progress and discuss some of the challenges he overcame in making a few sweeping changes within the district. 

Bryan Vine , El Toyon Elementary School
Title

Principal

Speaker Abstract

Bryan will explain the challenges and successes involved with being one of the first champions within his school district to promote sustainable best practices. He'll provide a road map based on his own experiences to other school staff and adminstrators on how to proceed to get the best results. 

Moderator

Debbi Dodson, Carton Council

Edible Food Recovery: Best Practices and Funding Policy

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 2:45 PM–4:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics / Edible Food Recovery

Session Description

The CRRA Edible Food Recovery Technical Council presents a comprehensive panel session exploring best practices, including input from environmental health, and a perspective on funding policies for edible food recovery. Presenters will dive into examples and resources for the audience, an analysis on the role of environmental health and policies on equitable funding. These speakers’ sessions represent diverse stakeholders who will be addressing these subjects with unique and effective perspectives based on their vast experience in edible food recovery. This session hopes to create clarity around SB1383 best practices in food recovery, providing tangible resources, legitimate case studies, and expansion on the challenging lessons learned throughout 2021 and 2022. With the unique perspective of Environmental Health and their familiarity within the foodservice industry, the audience will understand the complexities of the inspection process and Environmental Health’s possible involvement. As we have consistently learned, supporting pantries in their food recovery efforts is critical. We will explore equitable funding through a ‘bottom-up vs. top-down strategy’, expanding on efforts including community-led food recovery programs.

Speakers

Robin Martin, Joint Venture Silicon Valley
Title

Executive Director, Silicon Valley Food Rescue

Speaker Abstract

Robin Franz Martin presents an opportunity to learn a multitude of best practices, taking her knowledge of surplus edible food recovery experience as the Executive Director of the Food Recovery Initiative of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, and as the Manager of the Santa Clara County Food Recovery Program, handling all the food recovery portions of SB 1383 for all jurisdictions in Santa Clara County. This session will cover best practices of food safety and edible donation, coordination between jurisdictions working on SB 1383, materials to use to support leading methods for generators, nonprofits, and jurisdictions. Robin will provide the audience with resources and information relative to recovery, and touch on the preparation required for Tier 2 generation. Through her collaboration with food recovery organizations and services, she provides a thorough examination of methods for success with practical and actionable information for attendees.

John Ralls, Community Health Comm
Title

Director

Speaker Abstract

One commonly asked question relative to SB1383 that is still undefined includes what role will Environmental Health departments play throughout the state?  We will explore the varied roles local Environmental Health Departments can play from education, to inspection, and to compliance enforcement. Former Environmental Health Program Manager and current Food Bank Board Member, John Ralls will offer his unique and insightful perspectives surrounding the reasons for varied levels of participation statewide in each of these areas to provide needed insight and context to these complex relationships.  Mr. Ralls will also discuss the options available in jurisdictions where Environmental Health Department participation is limited.

Claudia Keller, Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County
Title

Chief Executive Officer

Speaker Abstract

Arguably the most critical element associated with the success of edible food recovery is funding. The ability to not only identify funding streams but ensure that the funding created is distributed in an equitable fashion that has the greatest impact on the community and meets the needs of those most vulnerable. Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County CEO, Claudia Keller, will discuss the importance of funding equity, the impact it can have on the community, and the potential strategies considered to accomplish this goal. Strategies discussed will include participatory grantmaking at the community level, collaborative coalitions, and an analysis of bottom-up vs. top-down funding models. The audience will have a deeper understanding of the various fund distribution approaches that can ensure greater inclusion and equity.

Moderator

Paddy Iyer, Daily Bowl

Next Level C&D - Implementing Ordinances, Using Collaboration, and Introducing Automation

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 2:45 PM–4:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B

Speakers

Moderator

Jerame Renteria, GreenWaste/Zanker Recycling

The End of the Demolition Era: The Rise of Deconstruction

Track

C&D

Speakers

Maybo AuYeung, Zero Waste Palo Alto
Title

Environmental Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

D is for Deconstruction: City of Palo Alto is pivoting from traditional Construction & Demolition to Construction & Deconstruction.

CALGreen building code requires that 65% of C&D debris must be diverted from most job sites in California, while Palo Alto’s local requirement is to reach 80% diversion. However, to achieve Palo Alto’s aggressive Zero Waste goal to reach 95% diversion by 2030 citywide, waste generated from C&D projects must be better managed. To address that, Palo Alto adopted the Deconstruction and Construction Materials Management Ordinance - the first deconstruction ordinance in the nation that targets both commercial and residential whole structure removal projects.

This presentation will share the development of the ordinance, provide an update on the ordinance implementation since July 2020, show case studies of completed deconstruction projects, and discuss feasibility and plans to expand the ordinance in the future.

Moderator

C&D Recycling Administration - Making CalGreen Work

Track

C&D

Speakers

Wanda Redic, City of Oakland
Title

Senior Recycling Specialist

Speaker Abstract

This presentation is about Oakland's approach to administering CalGreen recycling requirements. Beginning with a brief overview of Oakland's construction and demolition recycling requirements, the presentation will then share our experience with creating working collaborations across departments with Oakland's Planning and Building Services staff and how we worked to design and implement automated software systems, which now communicate with each other and that help us manage the current construction and demolition recycling program. I will also share Oakland's plans to increase automation between two different software systems which will reduce manual data entry and help us to meet the CalGreen requirements for recycling. The strategy we'll demonstrate, will work well for any City with limited staff resources to manage the day-to-day work to ensure and document recycling is compliant at all residential and non-residential construction projects.

Moderator

Break

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 4:15 PM–4:30 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

A Comprehensive County-wide Approach to Edible Food Recovery Capacity Planning

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 4:30 PM–6:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics / Edible Food Recovery

Session Description

 

Edible food recovery capacity planning is a new territory for jurisdictions across the State.  Hear about how Orange County and Santa Clara County chose to take a comprehensive county-wide look at edible food recovery capacity planning. 

Orange County worked with its local jurisdictions to host meetings, send out a survey and provide support to quantify the county-wide edible food recovery capacity numbers.  Part of this planning process included identifying resources needed to increase capacity at EFRO’s, such as more refrigerated storage, scales to weigh donated food, and more funding for permanent employees. 

 

Santa Clara is one of the leading counties in the State for edible food recovery capacity planning, with an effort that started long before 2020 with the development of County-wide infrastructure investments in the A La Carte food collection and distribution system.  The County’s Technical Advisory Committee utilizes Countywide funds under an MOA rather than a JPA, and is working collaboratively to implement a County-wide edible food program including management and monitoring by a third party consultant, and capacity analysis contracted on behalf of all 15 cities.  

 

Attendees of this session will learn about:

  • How to communicate effectively with jurisdictions in a County and provide tools for planning
  • Communication and capacity analysis
  • The best ways to talk to understaffed, overworked EFRO’s
  • Tips and tricks for collecting accurate capacity estimates
  • Benefits from a centrally planned ordinance
  • Plans to jointly support expansion of capacity based on study gap analysis

Speakers

Michele Young, County of Santa Clara Consumer and Environmental Protection Agency
Title

Senior Management Analyst

Speaker Abstract

Edible food recovery capacity planning is a new territory for jurisdictions across the State.  Hear about how Orange County and Santa Clara County chose to take a comprehensive county-wide look at edible food recovery capacity planning. 

Orange County worked with its local jurisdictions to host meetings, send out a survey and provide support to quantify the county-wide edible food recovery capacity numbers.  Part of this planning process included identifying resources needed to increase capacity at EFRO’s, such as more refrigerated storage, scales to weigh donated food, and more funding for permanent employees. 

 

Santa Clara is one of the leading counties in the State for edible food recovery capacity planning, with an effort that started long before 2020 with the development of County-wide infrastructure investments in the A La Carte food collection and distribution system.  The County’s Technical Advisory Committee utilizes Countywide funds under an MOA rather than a JPA, and is working collaboratively to implement a County-wide edible food program including management and monitoring by a third party consultant, and capacity analysis contracted on behalf of all 15 cities.  

 

Attendees of this session will learn about:

  • How to communicate effectively with jurisdictions in a County and provide tools for planning
  • Communication and capacity analysis
  • The best ways to talk to understaffed, overworked EFRO’s
  • Tips and tricks for collecting accurate capacity estimates
  • Benefits from a centrally planned ordinance
  • Plans to jointly support expansion of capacity based on study gap analysis
Danielle Osborne, CalRecycle
Title

--

Speaker Abstract

Edible food recovery capacity planning is a new territory for jurisdictions across the State.  Hear about how Orange County and Santa Clara County chose to take a comprehensive county-wide look at edible food recovery capacity planning. 

Orange County worked with its local jurisdictions to host meetings, send out a survey and provide support to quantify the county-wide edible food recovery capacity numbers.  Part of this planning process included identifying resources needed to increase capacity at EFRO’s, such as more refrigerated storage, scales to weigh donated food, and more funding for permanent employees. 
 
Santa Clara is one of the leading counties in the State for edible food recovery capacity planning, with an effort that started long before 2020 with the development of County-wide infrastructure investments in the A La Carte food collection and distribution system.  The County’s Technical Advisory Committee utilizes Countywide funds under an MOA rather than a JPA, and is working collaboratively to implement a County-wide edible food program including management and monitoring by a third party consultant, and capacity analysis contracted on behalf of all 15 cities.  
 
Attendees of this session will learn about:

  • How to communicate effectively with jurisdictions in a County and provide tools for planning
  • Communication and capacity analysis
  • The best ways to talk to understaffed, overworked EFRO’s
  • Tips and tricks for collecting accurate capacity estimates
  • Benefits from a centrally planned ordinance
  • Plans to jointly support expansion of capacity based on study gap analysis
Lisa Robles, EcoNomics, Inc.
Title

Senior Project Manager

Speaker Abstract

Edible food recovery capacity planning is a new territory for jurisdictions across the State.  Hear about how Orange County and Santa Clara County chose to take a comprehensive county-wide look at edible food recovery capacity planning. 

Orange County worked with its local jurisdictions to host meetings, send out a survey and provide support to quantify the county-wide edible food recovery capacity numbers.  Part of this planning process included identifying resources needed to increase capacity at EFRO’s, such as more refrigerated storage, scales to weigh donated food, and more funding for permanent employees. 

 

Santa Clara is one of the leading counties in the State for edible food recovery capacity planning, with an effort that started long before 2020 with the development of County-wide infrastructure investments in the A La Carte food collection and distribution system.  The County’s Technical Advisory Committee utilizes Countywide funds under an MOA rather than a JPA, and is working collaboratively to implement a County-wide edible food program including management and monitoring by a third party consultant, and capacity analysis contracted on behalf of all 15 cities.  

 

Attendees of this session will learn about:

  • How to communicate effectively with jurisdictions in a County and provide tools for planning
  • Communication and capacity analysis
  • The best ways to talk to understaffed, overworked EFRO’s
  • Tips and tricks for collecting accurate capacity estimates
  • Benefits from a centrally planned ordinance
  • Plans to jointly support expansion of capacity based on study gap analysis

Moderator

Christy Hurlburt, EcoNomics

Infrastructure Redesign Framework to Eliminate Structural Biases

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 4:30 PM–6:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B
Track

Policy

Session Description

There is a growing trend to rethink/redesign collection infrastructure holistically and intuitively guide recycling behavior. One can argue that most programs evolve from a legacy waste management system that simply grafts recycling and organics collections to a system that often maintains structural biases toward trash. This emerging redesign framework could be used to help decision-makers from all types of institutions/campuses understand practices like centralized collections, standardized bin colors and signage, removing redundant trash bins, etc. as part of a systems approach and not simply standalone initiatives. Guest speakers will briefly review what they consider fundamental elements of a successful infrastructure redesign framework, including:

  • Bin attributes
  • Metrics & measurement of success
  • Support from operations & training
  • Communication to occupants
  • Education of users
  • Designing for zero waste (new construction)
  • Institutionalizing zero waste efforts
  • Financing/RFPs with waste haulers
  • Beyond waste sorting (encouraging waste reduction/minimization)
  • Labeling and communications standards
  • Bin placement guidelines


Panelists will share firsthand experiences from transitioning waste collection infrastructure to a three-stream model through different approach strategies. Attendees will participate in an activity to think through the fundamental elements of their most pressing infrastructure initiative with an opportunity to crowdsource solutions to major challenges.

Speakers

Nikhil Schneider, California State University, Northridge
Title

Energy & Sustainability Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

For the vast majority of organizations, the approval/adoption of a zero waste plan doesn't include additional funding. For this reason, plan implementers must rely on grants or annual budgetary funds to implement the costly infrastructure measures required to meet zero waste goals. This presentation will discuss two unique funding mechanisms organizations can use to help allocate resources for zero waste initiatives.

Lin King, University of California Berkeley
Title

Zero Waste Manager

Speaker Abstract

Efforts to change waste infrastructure are often hampered by buildings that were not designed with zero waste or multi-stream collection in mind. This can take the form of trash chutes, limited space in dumpster enclosures, and other challenges. Constructing a new building with zero waste in mind creates significant opportunities to smooth the transition to zero waste. This can extend beyond a new building, so that it's features enable other facilities on the same campus to make transitions as well. Lin will go over the basic fundamental strategies of bins and infrastructure when designing buildings for zero waste. This includes right-sizing, collection points for different materials, bin attributes, the flow of material within and out of a building, and more. 

Lindsey Hutchison, The University of Texas Austin
Title

Senior Zero Waste Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

While many people see zero waste as an infrastructure initiative, the human component of zero waste efforts is the one which makes the most impact, and is often overlooked. Lindsey will share UT Austin's Zero Waste Workplace program, which introduces building occupants to waste management strategies through a top-down leadership approach. By gaining buy-in from managers and department heads, zero waste messaging can be kept consistent, and easily disseminated to a building's occupants. Lindsey will also discuss how waste audits play a role in the education and messaging process, as well as how to adjust when encountering resistance from building occupants.

Erika Kimball, Stanford Health Care
Title

Waste Reduction Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

U.S. Hospitals generate 5.9 million tons of waste per year and are an essential partner in achieving zero waste. Stanford Health Care (SHC) has built a comprehensive quality management program to minimize contamination in recycling and compost collection. SHC did so by aligning with haulers on materials and quality standards, establishing evidence-based bin and label guidelines, engaging and educating staff, and conducting audits for bin and sorting compliance. The results are a recycling and compost program built for quality. While the scope of the zero-waste program represents a relatively small percentage of total hospital waste, SHC is using the program as a model for waste reduction throughout the institution. Hospital waste management is complicated and takes time to adjust, but hospitals’ waste quality and compliance expertise make them a valuable partner in operationalizing zero waste regulations. 

Moderator

Alec Cooley, Busch Systems

Resource Recovery Parks as a Solution for the Self-Haul Sector

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 4:30 PM–6:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B
Track

C&D

Session Description

Resource Recovery Parks are places where materials can be dropped off for donation or buyback and co-locate reuse, recycling and composting, and processing.

 

The Resource Recovery Park concept has been evolving naturally at landfills and transfer stations. These facilities can provide additional recycling opportunities for self-hauled loads brought to "the dump." Landfills and transfer stations have been sited near the centers of discarded materials generation. A Resource Recovery Park can make the landfill or transfer station more sustainable by diversifying revenue, conserving capacity, and extending the useful life of those facilities.

 

A significant fraction of materials delivered to landfills and transfer stations in California are from self-haul customers. These are the "missing tons," typically not included in municipal contracts or regulated by local ordinances. 

 

We will hear from facilities that are addressing self-haul loads through policies and programs, including:

  • Berkeley Serial MRF
  • San Luis Obispo - Cold Canyon Landfill
  • Monterey Regional Waste Managment District

Speakers

Felipe Melchor, ReGen Monterey
Title

General Manager

Speaker Abstract

Formed in 1951, ReGen Monterey (Monterey Regional Waste Management District) operates with the aim to reduce waste towards zero. Their 475-acre property is home to: a material recovery facility, C&D processing operation, windrow composting facility, anaerobic digester, household hazardous waste facility, Last Chance Mercantile, and a landfill with 75-100 years of capacity. 

 

Martin Bourque, Ecology Center
Title

Executive Director

Speaker Abstract

A Serial Materials Recovery Facility “Serial MRF” is the regionally co-located, but decentralized, version of a Resource Recovery Park addressing reuse, recycling and compost collection, processing, manufacturing and retail businesses (and/or nonprofits) for the 12 market categories of materials. Berkeley's serial MRF includes, the Berkeley Transfer Station, where the Ecology Center is an anchor tenant, is the center of the system. The transfer station is a regional destination for self-haul customers. The City is currently redesigning its transfer station to increase convenience and diversion. Martin will take us on a tour of the serial MRF and we will hear about the other components and future plans.

Max Wechsler, Urban Ore
Title

Operations Manager

Speaker Abstract

Urban Ore is another key component of the Berkeley serial MRF, providing a unique role in the recovery ecosystem. Urban Ore started at City's landfill in 1980, salvaging materials from self-haul customer delivering their discards to "the dump." It moved to the City's transfer station and then to its current 3-acre site and includes both a building materials exchange and a general store. Salvagers still rescue reusable items from the transfer station and transport the materials to the site.

In 2019, Urban Ore’s gross revenue had been stuck at $2.6M for a decade. As costs continued to rise, things weren’t looking too good. Then the pandemic happened. In 2022, the company grossed $3.5M. How did this happen? Max will present on the challenges and opportunities that COVID has created for the reuse retail industry, including how being a for-profit has helped in Urban Ore’s success. He will also touch upon the trailblazing salvage service contract that the company has renewed with the City of Berkeley.

Peter Cron, Public Works, County of San Luis Obispo
Title

Solid Waste Coordinator III

Speaker Abstract

The Cold Canyon Landfill, operated by Waste Connections, hosts the San Luis Obispo Resource Recovery Park. The Resource Recovery Park was opened in early 2000 to accept C & D materials from roll off companines and commercial customers. The park was expanded in May 2003 to over 100,000 square feet to accomodate public and self-haul. 

The Resource Recovery Park includes a public drop-off facility, a construction and demolition (C&D) recycling operation, a household hazardous waste drop-off facility, a universal and electronic waste recycling center, and an equipment maintenance facility. Materials collected, sorted, and recovered in the bunkers include cardboard, metal and appliances, green waste, wood waste, concrete/asphalt/brick, trash, tires, drywall, and other paper and plastic materials.

Self-haulers directed to bunkers for separating materials (Metal, Yard trimmings, C&D).
Self-haulers must separate materials for recycling or face an additional Facility Use Fee for by-passing separation area. As a result, 97% of self-haulers separate materials.

Moderator

Richard Anthony, Global Recycling Council

Whole School Approach to Zero Waste

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 4:30 PM–6:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A
Track

Schools

Session Description

It takes a collaborative effort across all aspects of school operations to achieve a zero waste campus. Whole school operations can be represented by the 4C’s Framework: Curriculum, Campus and Operations, Community Engagement, and overall Institutional Culture. When schools adopt the 4C’s Framework and apply it to zero waste, these initiatives become operationalized and lead to long-term waste reduction and diversion. RethinkWaste, The County of San Mateo Office of Sustainability, and San Mateo County Office of Education will discuss tried-and-true strategies they have used to engage stakeholders in all of the 4C’s. San Mateo County teachers, students, and school administrators will join virtually to share their experiences bridging the gaps between school operations and community education to develop and maintain waste reduction programs. Whether you are a seasoned zero waste schools veteran or just starting out, all participants will leave with practical next steps to jumpstart (or add a little “oomph!”) to enhance their zero waste initiatives in schools and districts in their local areas.

Speakers

Gerald Schwartz, The County of San Mateo Office of Sustainability
Title

Resource Conservation Specialist III

Speaker Abstract

Gerald Schwartz from the County of San Mateo Office of Sustainability will open the session by introducing the complexities of working with schools in San Mateo County. He will walk participants through the 4C’s Framework (Campus, Curriculum, Community Engagement, and Institutional Culture) and theories of change that relate directly to school zero waste initiatives. Session participants will consider which “stage of change” their school communities are currently at and different ways governmental agencies and haulers can support zero waste changes at schools and districts. This support includes technical assistance, award, and funding programs such as the County of San Mateo Office of Sustainability 4R’s Grant Program. Participants will finish this portion of the session with knowledge and resources to bring a whole school approach to their zero waste initiatives.

Teresa Montgomery, South San Francisco Scavenger Company and Blue Line Transfer
Title

Sustainability Manager

Speaker Abstract

A key part of a whole school's approach to zero waste initiatives is knowing the roles and responsibilities of all school stakeholders. Teresa Montgomery, from South San Francisco Scavenger (a local waste hauler/processor), will discuss each stakeholder group and effective strategies for engaging them in a zero waste initiative. Later on in this presentation Teresa will share how community partners, like South San Francisco Scavenger, has approached supporting schools that are taking a whole school approach to zero waste initiatives. Teresa can share examples and tips for other community partner agencies on where to get started with schools, and how having a whole school mindset has helped her understand the complexities of school waste initiatives. 

Reyna Oceguera, RethinkWaste – SBWMA
Title

Environmental Education Associate

Speaker Abstract

When it comes to implementing waste diversion programs in schools there are three recommended project management phases: stakeholder buy-in with strategic planning, program and curriculum implementation, and sustained success (a.k.a. lots and lots of follow-up!). There are embedded tools within each stage that include waste assessments, Green Champion recognitions, supplemental education, and more. It is critical to pair student and staff education with new waste infrastructure which improves access and reach of informational resources. Laura Wessberg will walk through these best practices for developing new waste diversion programs and refreshing or re-booting existing initiatives. Additionally, case studies from schools in San Mateo County will be sprinkled in throughout the session via video recordings, images, and shared stories.

Moderator

Joe La Mariana, SBWMA and RethinkWaste

Belching Beaver Brewery - Oceanside Brewhouse *

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 6:30 PM–8:00 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Offsite/Various

Speakers

Manuel Medrano, California Resource Recovery Association - CRRA
Title
Speaker Abstract

1334 Rocky Point Drive, Oceanside, CA

Belching Beaver is part of the San Diego Brewcycling Collaborative. They are welcoming our attendees on Thursday evening for brewery tours and a bit of fun. In addition to learning about the great work the Brewcycle Collaborative is doing to improve waste reduction efforts at local breweries and distilleries, attendants will also enjoy a fun night of bingo and Delish Dogs will be serving their great food (no host).

 

The San Diego Brewcycling Collaborative is a volunteer-based organization that is offering breweries and distilleries in San Diego County an opportunity to positively impact the environment by providing them with a better system to sort and recycle the waste they generate. They’ve created a new collaborative recycling program that properly and responsibly recycles malt bags, grain bags, paktechs, shrink wrap, aluminum and cardboard.

They wish to create awareness about the plastic crisis, as well as the broken recycling system, by educating our citizens and uniting the industry and the county. Their goal is to achieve this awareness while diverting unnecessary waste from landfills and promoting the necessity for Extended Producer Responsibility. Learn more about what they're doing at sdbrewcycling.org.

*This is not an official CRRA-sponsored event. Attendees are on their own; CRRA is not providing any services related to the event.

Moderator

NCRA Players Show

Thursday, September 8, 2022 at 8:30 PM–11:59 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal

Speakers

Moderator

Yoga with Tedd Ward

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 7:20 AM–8:15 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Registration Desk

Speakers

Moderator

Continental Breakfast

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 8:00 AM–8:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Terrace

Speakers

Moderator

Equity Through Multi-family Recycling

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 9:00 AM–10:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A
Track

Diversity & Environmental Justice

Session Description

In most cities, some communities have been afforded greater access to resources than others including access to methods and information for reducing and diverting waste. It’s important that residential recycling and waste reduction education and outreach programs plan for methods that address multi-family properties that have unique waste challenges and require different approaches that are inclusive of diverse residential communities. Our panel of presenters from the San Francisco Department of Environment, City of San Diego Environmental Services, and The Recycling Partnership address environmental justice and social equity concerns through recent projects that prioritize and allocate zero waste resources to increase greater participation from multifamily residents. Learn about multifamily technical assistance and education and outreach methods that focuses on addressing waste reduction and recycling participation barriers by supporting and working collaboratively with diverse multifamily residents and multifamily property types. 

Speakers

Andrea Deleon, City of San Diego Environmental Services Department
Title

Recycling Specialist III

Speaker Abstract

Helping residents recycle right at multi-family properties can be challenging especially during a pandemic.  The City of San Diego’s Environmental Services Department partnered with The Recycling Partnership on a multi-family recycling outreach pilot project to improve recycling material quality. City staff tested in-person door-to-door outreach with a bilingual team who distributed multilingual outreach materials and recycle tote bags to residents. The outreach focused in neighborhoods with linguistically diverse residents, properties with high recycling contamination, and communities of concerns as identified by the City’s Climate Equity Index. We believe language barriers may play a factor in some multifamily residents not recycling correctly. Property managers who participated in the study were also supported with recycling technical assistance. The City collected and analyzed data to measure their outreach impact before and after the door-to-door outreach was conducted through waste characterization studies and property bin visual audits. Resident surveys in English and Spanish were also conducted. Learn more about best practices and lessons learned for designing multilingual outreach materials, and how to effectively and safely provide education to multifamily residents.

Freddy Coronado, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Title

Residential Zero Waste Specialist

Speaker Abstract

San Francisco’s Department of the Environment continuously strives to expand, maintain, and ensure equity on its zero waste programs. Implementing zero waste programs in the multifamily sector can be challenging and often low-income and immigrant communities are burdened by the implementation of zero waste programs. San Francisco is home to over 400 affordable housing multi-family dwellings that are closely identified by the Mayor’s Office of Housing. The portfolio includes low-income senior and family housing, single-room occupancy hotels, and housing for the formerly unhoused.  

The Residential Zero Waste team in partnership with the Department’s Environmental Justice team have developed special protocols for providing technical assistance and outreach to these sites that put equity and race front and center when aiding property managers, non-profit housing developers, and residents. This presentation will focus on San Francisco’s Department of the Environment’s push to become a more equitable and inclusive government institution that serves all community members.

Asami Tanimoto, The Recycling Partnership
Title

Senior Community Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

Multifamily recycling education is complex for so many reasons. One challenge is that multifamily dwellers tend to be more diverse – racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically. Do your education materials work for everyone? How do you start to communicate with this diverse audience? The Recycling Partnership recently executed multiple multifamily initiatives with diversity, equity, and inclusion components built into the community projects. In Tacoma, Washington outreach materials were developed in multiple different languages and focus groups were conducted in English, Spanish, Russian, and Vietnamese to test the materials. The result was a toolkit available online to property managers and residents with transcreated posters and informational handouts. In Portland, Oregon local community organizations were engaged to reach immigrants and refugees, low-income families, and people who are not proficient in speaking or reading in English. The organizations and their community members created their own outreach to fit the needs of the communities they represent. Attendees will learn tactics these communities and others have used to improve equity in multifamily recycling education and lessons they can take with them to incorporate into their own education and outreach efforts. 

Moderator

Wanda Redic, City of Oakland

It's All About the Data - Time to Measure Up

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 9:00 AM–10:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B

Speakers

Moderator

Manuel Medrano, City of Chula Vista / CRRA

Hard Numbers, Hard Truths: Surveys and Spot Checks Guide Outreach

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Nancy Roberts, Gigantic Idea Studio
Title

Senior Associate

Speaker Abstract

Data is important for understanding baseline information and tracking trends, but it also directly informs education and outreach messaging. This session will focus on food scrap participation and will draw upon Gigantic Idea Studio’s survey and cart spot check results for the Cities of Livermore and Milpitas. We will look at eight years of cart spot check data from Livermore, compare a resident survey from 2014 to one conducted in 2022, and see how collected data has informed outreach content over the years.  A recent drop in organics cart participation prompted the Livermore Recycles team to take a close look at outreach efforts to see how to reinvigorate residents around recycling right. In Milpitas, changes in service and a new hauler led to dissatisfaction around rate increases, and confusion about the new food scrap recycling program. The Milpitas team used a survey to understand the community’s concerns and cart audits to check actual behavior and collect food scrap participation data. Using this information, a messaging plan was created to address barriers and benefits and increase a sense of value of the new and improved services.

Session participants will gain insight into how data can inform and improve campaigns at strategic and tactical levels and get some nuts-and-bolts tips about creating and interpreting resident surveys, including their uses and drawbacks.

Moderator

No Room to Waste in this Space

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Chelsea Nelson, Action Research
Title

Research Associate

Speaker Abstract

Residential food scraps collection programs often deliver kitchen pails to residents along with the do's and don'ts of program participation. How do agencies go about deciding what information to put on the pail? How much information (space) is needed on the pail to help residents make accurate decisions about what goes inside?

In 2021, in collaboration with the Salinas Valley Solid Waste Authority, we conducted a web-based survey to test the number of icons (2, 3, or 4) needed on the pail to represent each of four food categories - fruits, vegetables, meats, and grains. We tested how to convey "no" items - icons only, icons & text, or text only, and do cheese and egg icons represent the variety of dairy items. 

The web survey was sent out by two jurisdictions in the Salinas Valley Region. There were 194 completed surveys. The survey was administered in English and Spanish.

Respondents were randomly assigned to receive different surveys that displayed two, three, or four icons for each food category. Respondents were shown one set of icons followed by a list of food items and asked to choose the items they think belong in the category represented by the icons. The number of correct items were summed and compared across the two-, three-, and four-icon groups. The results demonstrated that using two icons was sufficient to represent each of the food categories, "no" items were best addressed using text, and supplemental materials were needed to assist with seeds, pits, bones, and spoiled foods.

Moderator

Using Data to Design Effective Food Scrap Recycling Outreach

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Bailey Hall, City of Sunnyvale
Title

Environmental Programs Specialist

Speaker Abstract

The City of Sunnyvale rolled out its first food scraps collection program in 2017 using a split cart-design for both garbage and food scraps. After running for three years, the City wanted to conduct outreach to address community feedback. In order to craft effective messaging, more information was needed. Sunnyvale, with the help of Gigantic Idea Studio, conducted an online survey and cart inspections to gather data on attitudes, barriers, benefits and observed vs. self-reported participation rates.

After collecting this data, Sunnyvale and Gigantic Idea Studio crafted a campaign using videos, social media promotions, print ads and city newsletter articles. They also conducted a cart tagging pilot program. Cart audits were conducted before and after cart tagging to compare changes in measured participation rates in the three pilot groups. Each group received a different tag: A) “Social Norming”, B) “Barriers”, and C) Control (no tags).

Attendees will learn how to conduct research cost-effectively, and how to use that research to craft messaging using social marking practices such as social norming and addressing barriers and benefits. They will also learn how one Bay Area community responded to a novel food scraps program—one that uses a split garbage cart instead of the traditional yard trimmings/organics carts.

Moderator

Leveraging Direct Service Providers to Meet Procurement Targets: Case Studies

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 9:00 AM–10:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics

Session Description

Working with Direct Service Providers will be critical for many jurisdictions to work toward their SB 1383 procurement targets.  This session will provide three examples of creative ways to work leverage the ability to use a direct service provider to meet procurement targets.  San Mateo County will discuss their work with the non-profit organization Zero Foodprint and the San Mateo County Resource Conservation District to provide compost to farmers and ranchers.  Zero Waste Sonoma will present their innovative compost rebate program that subsidizes agricultural compost use Sonoma County, creating Direct Service Providers of rebate applicants.  Agromin will discuss and demonstrate of their new tool, "California Compost" designed to help connect jurisdictions with compost suppliers and users.  

Speakers

Xinci Tan, Zero Waste Sonoma
Title

Organics Program Manager

Speaker Abstract

In most of Northern California, the demand for finished compost and mulch often exceeds supply. Although the state's SB 1383 organic waste products procurement requirements were well-intentioned, they are challenging for jurisdictions in Sonoma County to satisfy without disrupting existing markets. Zero Waste Sonoma has developed a compost rebate program that will preserve and leverage existing market relationships, minimize costs to local jurisdictions, and support local efforts to encourage carbon sequestration. 

Kimberly Cook, Agromin
Title

Central and NorCal Business Development Manager

Speaker Abstract

With SB1383 procurement requirements around the corner, it is helpful to know what options are available for compost procurement and procurement reporting. The California Compost website provides both of these solutions to jurisdictions statewide. Since each County and City has unique needs and requirements, attendees to this presentation will explore case studies showing how the California Compost website, as well as Agromin’s procurement brokering services, have supported diverse jurisdictional needs and representing multiple paths to SB1383 compliance. 

Jack Steinmann, County of San Mateo
Title

Resource Conservation Specialist II - Waste Reduction

Speaker Abstract

The County of San Mateo Office of Sustainability is piloting different direct service provider/compost broker arrangements in collaboration with jurisdictions within the County, the South Bay Waste Management Authority, the San Mateo Resource Conservation District (RCD), and Zero Foodprint in order to meet SB 1383’s recovered organic waste procurement requirements. The pilots focus on farm and rangeland compost application, local compost application planning, and assessment of compost quality and infrastructure needs to scale compost use in San Mateo County. The goal of these pilots is to develop programs within the County that any jurisdiction can participate in to meet their SB 1383 procurement requirements that also increases carbon sequestions, improves our county’s climate resiliency, and supports our local food system.


Moderator

Michele Young, CRRA

Money, Money, Money...Money - Funding and A Look At Projects

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 9:00 AM–10:30 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B

Speakers

Moderator

Timonie Hood, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9

U.S. EPA Circular Economy Strategy & Big Funding Opportunities

Track

Markets

Speakers

Nena Shaw, U.S. EPA
Title

Acting Director

Speaker Abstract

In 2021, U.S. EPA announced the first National Recycling Strategy with a focus on environmental justice and detailed actions to:

 

  • Improve Markets
  • Increase Collection and Improve Materials Management Infrastructure
  • Reduce Contamination
  • Enhance Policies and Programs, and
  • Standardize Measurement and Increase Data Collections
     
    This session will provide information about the federal government’s largest investment ever through new EPA grant programs:
  • Solid Waste Infrastructure for Recycling Grants to States, Tribes and Territories ($55 million/year through FY22-26)
  • Consumer Recycling Education and Outreach Grants ($15 million/year FY 22-26) funding opportunities for states, Tribes, nonprofit organizations, and public-private partnerships
  • Pollution Prevention Grants to States, Tribes, and Territories ($20 million/year FY22-26)
  • Battery Recycling Best Practices and Labeling Guidelines ($35 million/not grants)

Information on the federal and EPA focus on funding underserved communities to advance environmental justice will be covered.

The presentation will share key links to information on grant solicitations and National Recycling and Circular Economy Strategy implementation.

Moderator

A New Outlook on Payment Program Projects

Track

Markets

Speakers

Colleen Foster, City of Oceanside
Title

Environmental Officer

Speaker Abstract

Tired of the same boring purchases with Beverage Container Recycling City Payment Program funds? Looking to purchase more than just recycling containers? The City of Oceanside utilized their funds to purchase water refills stations for parks, community facilities, and beach and harbor locations throughout the Oceanside community. But wait-there’s more! This Payment Program doesn’t just support zero waste, but other City initiatives as well. Staff partnered with numerous City departments such as Parks, Maintenance, the Oceanside Harbor, Neighborhood Services, and the Water Conservation program to make the installation happen and benefit Oceanside ratepayers. They also partnered with organizations like Visit Oceanside and Bike Oceanside to make refill stations accessible to all. Tune in to learn how the team’s vision came to be, and how you can utilize YOUR city’s payment program funds to reduce blight and litter throughout your community, encourage the use of local tap water, and stop plastic consumption at the source by promoting the use of refillable water bottles. It’s a win-win for everybody!

Moderator

CalRecycle Grant & Funding Opportunities

Track

Markets

Speakers

Michelle Martin, CalRecycle
Title

Branch Chief, Financial Resources Management Branch

Speaker Abstract

Please complete...

Marissa Cota, CalRecycle
Title

Section Manager

Speaker Abstract

Moderator

Break

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 10:30 AM–10:45 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Exhibits Foyer

Speakers

Moderator

Common Sense Combined with Education - Addressing What Must Matter

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze A

Speakers

Moderator

Laura McKaughan, Alameda County Industries

Conservation Education and Outreach Adapts to Pandemic, OHA Recycling Initiative

Track

Diversity & Environmental Justice

Speakers

Faustina Mututa, City of Oakland Housing Authority
Title

Resource Conservation Manager

Speaker Abstract

City of Oakland’s Housing Authority (OHA) provides subsidized housing to nearly 16,500 families. OHA serves a diverse community in neighborhoods throughout the city. OHA owns and manages over 200 scattered sites, and 6 large campuses of multifamily dwellings (MFDs) and 6 administrative buildings. The MFDs range from 4 to over 300 units. These properties are covered by local and state resource recovery mandates. How is OHA contributing to equitable access to recycling and composting in affordable housing?

As a participant in the Department of Housing & Urban Development’s (HUD) Moving to Work (MTW) Demonstration Program, OHA works with community partners and stakeholders to develop and implement innovative solutions to the persistent issues of access to quality affordable housing, and lack of opportunity in America’s very low income neighborhoods. OHA acts as one of “America’s Housing Policy Labs,” demonstrating and evaluating new solutions that can be replicated across the country; a goal of the recycling initiative. The presentation is a story of OHA’s recycling education initiative, and how it has adapted to the pandemic. OHA strives to provide equitable access to recycling and compost by providing on-going education and tools. The audience will learn and takeaway the following:

  • OHA role in recycling education
  • Modeling recycling behavior starting with OHA staff
  • How to meet residents where they are
  • Representation matters in program development and implementation
  • In-person interaction vs virtual outreach
  • Effective messaging resulting in maximum participation
  • Why environmental education is important to marginalized communities

Moderator

Zero Waste: Who and What We Throw Away Matters

Track

Diversity & Environmental Justice

Speakers

Tony Green, Speaking Green Communications
Title

Principal/Consultant

Speaker Abstract

Zero Waste has been presented as a method to mitigate the impacts of climate change. The waste produced in our landfills is a large contributor to greenhouse gasses. Many of the impacts of climate change resulting from the addition of greenhouse gases is uneven, as example the location of landfills in areas where people of color live. Achieving Zero Waste poses to have benefits from reducing the land needed for landfills yet our greatest possible benefit might not the reducing the number of materials we landfill but the restoring the status of certain people who lives are currently viewed as disposable. Achieving Zero Waste regarding people, not materials, will be a keystone of the sustainable future we seek.      

Attendees will learn: 

  1. * Why achieving Zero Waste for materials might not be enough for those who are impacted by climate change the most  
  1. * Why climate change activists have historically prioritized animals and materials over certain human beings  
  1. * What is means to achieve Zero Waste from a human perspective 
  1. * The relationship between of Zero Waste to climate equity 

Moderator

Zero Waste Outreach to Chinese Communities – Stories and Lessons Learned from the Field

Track

Diversity & Environmental Justice

Speakers

Terry Ng, Cascadia Consulting Group
Title

Associate

Speaker Abstract

Cantonese and Mandarin are among the most common non-English spoken languages in the Bay Area. Cascadia Consulting Group provides extensive zero waste engagement services to Chinese business owners across the Bay Area, particularly those who primarily serve this important demographic. Our work has included an in-person workshop in partnership with the Oakland Chinatown Chamber of Commerce, a webinar for Chinese business owners in Alameda County about SB 1383, in-store outreach in San Francisco to promote reduction of single-use food ware and checkout bags… and more! Our multilingual team provides written and verbal translation and transcreation services, in-person and virtually, to overcome unique barriers to participation. Through our projects, we’ve learned a lot and even incorporated our lessons learned into our company’s internal culture. In the last year, our experiences helped create and shape Cascadia’s Community Based Organization Relationships Subcommittee, as well as our Translation, Transcreation and Interpretation Protocol. Come hear our stories from the field and lessons learned through our service to the Chinese community in the Bay Area.

Moderator

Inspections, Collections, Reviews - Oh My - Fundamental Outreach Lessons Learned

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Breakwater A/B

Speakers

Moderator

Robert Hilton, HF&H Consultants, LLC

Business Inspections: Lessons from the Field

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Mallika Sen, Solana Center for Environmental Innovation
Title

Director of Environmental Solutions

Speaker Abstract

Solana Center for Environmental Innovation has been consulting to business, event-organizers, and schools about waste prevention and diversion for a decade. The result is thousands of pounds of edible foods donated from school cafeterias; hundreds of businesses receiving outreach and training; and events achieving as much as 98% diversion. Mallika’s team has addressed a variety of issues, including logistics, motivation, infrastructure, rescue partnerships, and donation dumping by food businesses. Mallika will share lessons from the field based on the years of work by her and her team. She will also discuss trends in behaviors and solutions that she has witnessed.

Moderator

Collaborative Field Outreach: How to Conduct Effective Route Reviews

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Emily Coven, Recyclist
Title

Founder, CEO

Speaker Abstract

Boots-on-the-ground outreach is hard work. From visual inspections to full blown waste audits, there is so much information to collect and so many people to educate. Unsurprisingly, fieldwork tools and cloud-based software have become an integral part of waste characterization and contamination monitoring. For managing SB 1383’s Route Review requirements, jurisdictions and their outreach collaborators need a solution for seamless data collection and management. Luckily, Recyclist has been developing tools for collaborative outreach since 2014.

 

Since the initial planning of SB 1383, Recyclist has researched and developed tools for not only the entire Implementation Record, but also for Route Reviews specifically. Working with organizations who were already conducting lid-flipping audits like The Recycling Partnership, Recyclist was able to refine the tool in preparation for SB 1383. Recyclist Program Tracker customers may now efficiently gather their Route Review data in the field and use it for more than just fulfilling state requirements. With accurate information, photos and results collected in real-time, organizations can use their reports to improve program participation and reduce contamination levels. Tune into this session to learn about how Recyclist customers have utilized the Recyclist Program Tracker’s Route Review tool, and how you can put their best practices into action in your program. Let’s tangibly move the needle towards higher participation and lower contamination in our recycling and organics programs. 

Moderator

Sunnyvale - Food Scraps Collection and Processing Program

Track

Outreach

Speakers

Deepti Jain, City of Sunnyvale, Solid Waste Division
Title

Environmental Engineering Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

This paper presents insights on the success of the City of Sunnyvale’s food scarps collection and processing programs. In 2017, City introduced a food scraps collection program to single-family households with a goal to divert organics that Sunnyvale residents were disposing of in the garbage. Since January 2022, all commercial customers and multi-family residential customers are also enrolled in it. Additionally, the City of Sunnyvale provides a separate collection of food scraps to businesses.

The city’s franchise waste hauler (Specialty) collects organics from residential and commercial businesses. 

Collected food scraps loads are brought to the Sunnyvale Material Recovery and Transfer Station (SMaRT Station®) for pre-processing where it's converted into an organic slurry. The resultant slurry is transported to the Sustainable Organic Solutions (SOS) animal feed production facility in Santa Clara. 

 

The City is exploring anaerobic digestion of the organic slurry at the City's Plant in near future. 

 

The goal of this paper presentation is to share the evolution of the program, provide insights to implement and run a successful food scraps collection program, and, in particular, explore the implementation challenges a jurisdiction can face given the regulatory changes. The paper presentation will also share insights gained in the process of implementing, convincing the community, technical, political, and economic parameters as part of the evaluation process.

 

The audience will learn: 

  • Insights gained through the development and implementation of the program 
  • How the key factors of technology, environmental benefit, economics, and policy may influence the selection of the preferred strategy. 

Moderator

San Francisco's BottleBank - Is this the Bottle Bill Fix?

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Seagaze B
Track

Markets

Session Description

On January 5th, 2022, San Francisco launched a new mobile recycling pilot program to facilitate recycling and make it easier for residents to reclaim their California Redemption Value cash deposit for recyclables.

The new program, called the BottleBank® CRV Redemption System, is being funded by the California Department of Resources and Recycling Recovery through implementation of Senate Bill 458 (2017).

To participate in the program, residents can sign up online or in-person and receive bags with special barcodes. Participants can then fill up the 20-gallon bags with uncrushed CRV bottles and cans and drop them off at mobile collection sites, operated by the non-profit organization San Francisco Conservation Corps.

Once the recyclables are counted, participants can get their refund amount deposited into their accounts. The funds can then be transferred to their bank or Venmo accounts, or transferred to a card for cash.

The pilot uses bottle drop technology from the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative (a partner in the pilot) and Waste Zero bags with QR codes for matching the bags to the customer. Our Planet Recycling (one of only two certified redemption centers left in the City), the recycler of record hosts the processing system. 

Let's see if this works!

Speakers

Kevin Drew, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Title

Special Zero Waste Projects Coordinator

Speaker Abstract

When the Market Street recycling center closed in 2013, it caused a cascade effect. Market conditions and issues with supermarket parking lot sites led to the closure of over 800 redemption centers throughout California. This led to the creation of numerous "recycling deserts," including in San Francisco which had once hosted over 30 sites for beverage container recycling.   

The perception of recycling as a dirty business that attracted rowdy people and other nuisances led many supermarkets to evict their recycling centers and, instead, pay (or not pay) a $100 per day fine (as required by CalRecycle). 

For the past five years, the City has been crafting a solution. After meeting with small mom & pop beverage dealers and supermarket chains and reviewing alternative programs in Maine and Oregon, the Bottle Bank concept emerged as a way to reduce impacts on the stores and increase convenience for residents.

The program launched in January and by September, we will be able to tell you how it's working and what it's going to take to fix the Bottle Bill for San Francisco. 

Tom Wright, City and County of San Francisco
Title

Consultant Project Lead and Brand Manager

Speaker Abstract

The BottleBank brand was developed for San Francisco as a project of the San Francisco CRV Convenience Alliance. The BottleBank program includes a website (https://sfbottlebank.org) and mobile app where customers can track their deposits and get their nickel back. The BottleBank branding and logos are displayed on the pilot trucks and worker clothing. Branding will be important to the success of the program as it creates buzz, recognition and customer loyalty. The national beverage companies (Coke, Pepsi, Bud) know the importance of branding and can become partners in the program, eventually sponsoring parking lot locations and supporting schools and scouts in recycling drives and fundraising. Download the app from the app store, collect your cans and bottles and come and redeem them in San Francisco. Then let your legislators know that you want a BottleBank equivalent in your community.

Jules Bailey, Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative
Title

Executive Vice President

Speaker Abstract

With over 50 years of experience operating a bottle deposit and return program, Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative is one of the most experienced and successful Extended Producer Responsibility organizations in the world.  OBRC is now partnering with the City of San Francisco, Cal Recycle, Our Planet Recycling, and the San Francisco Conservation Corps to bring technology and innovation to the BottleBank pilot.  This session will give an overview of the BottleDrop program in Oregon, and how it relates to BottleBank in San Francisco, highlighting the program's operational efficiency and consumer accessibility.  It will give an inside look at not only the operations, technology, and programs underpinning the program, but also the legislation and policy behind it.

Moderator

Ruth Abbe, Co-Chair

Substantial Effort – Revisiting City of Oceanside’s Organics Program

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 10:45 AM–12:15 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal
Track

Organics

Session Description

The City of Oceanside is back at CRRA to give an update on how it's Food Scraps Recycling Program in the face of SB 1383. Although the program was designed in 2019, re-designed in the face of COVID in 2020, and implemented from 2020 to now, Oceanside is having to face increased scrutiny from CalRecycle as of 2022. Come see how one of the leaders in organic servicing is doing with SB 1383. 

Speakers

Colleen Foster, City of Oceanside
Title

Environmental Officer

Speaker Abstract

The City and its waste hauler, Waste Management, designed its commercial organics program starting in September 2019 in response to AB 1826 and in preparation for SB 1383. With in-person outreach commencing in January 2020, with services slated for delivery in March 2020, Staff could never have foreseen the economic and logistical impact of COVID-19. In March 2020, Staff had to immediately halt deliveries and refocus programming to account for unprecedented business shutdowns and subsequent economic challenges. While working to relaunch food scraps service deliveries in August 2020, Staff worked to completely reorient outreach materials and messaging that emphasized cost savings through rightsizing and downsizing, as well virtual resources and training support in collaboration with the hauler, third party consultants, and the City’s design firm. To demonstrate flexibility and customer service, Staff also redesigned all scripts, emails, letters, and FAQs documents to accommodate the challenging and unpredictability felt by businesses throughout 2020. In order to provide a simple, easy, and useful service launch, City Staff redesigned the logistics of physically delivering signs, printed guides, and interior receptacles to each business following delivery of their food scraps recycling bin or cart.  Due to the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, the City was able to develop and successfully implement a hybrid rollout of commercial food scraps services with materials distributed physically and digitally, hosting webinars, and by offering both in person and virtual training opportunities.

Annika Andersen, City of Oceanside
Title

Environmental Specialist II

Speaker Abstract

Since December 2020, the City and Waste Management have been focused on providing more tailored outreach and attention to the remaining businesses that are still unsubscribed to food scraps recycling services. The remaining businesses who have yet to receive food scraps recycling services represent the most challenging generators to add food scraps recycling services, as they are low-volume generators primarily subscribing to the lowest volume service available (three cubic yard trash service with once a week pick-up), have space constraints, and/or economic challenges. To support the program’s implementation and improve the materials collected from the food scraps bin, the City and WM went through multiple phases of development of a contamination notification program. The resulting program includes a designed “Oops Tag”, accompanied by an automatic email, and a more detailed email letting businesses know of common contaminants found within their bins. This program was further developed to prepare for an SB 1383 monitoring program, and was launched in late 2021 in time for 2022 requirements and head of contamination charges from Waste Management. Participants will gain insight into how to develop educational resources in response to common issues of a rapidly developing program and changing conditions on the ground.

Philip Mainolfi, HF&H Consultants
Title

Project Manager

Speaker Abstract

Although the City has made great efforts in bringing food scraps services to businesses, CalRecycle still considers the City out of compliance with AB 1826 as of January 2022. While the City has demonstrated good faith effort on AB 1826, Staff are having to adapt and accelerate the timeline of rollout for the remaining businesses and all Multi-Family complexes to comply with SB 1383. City staff worked with its consultants at HF&H to provide a comprehensive and accelerated timeline for bringing the remaining businesses and all the multi-family complexes automatic food scraps service delivery in the first few months of 2022, within the context of increased COVID resurgences and labor shortages. Consultant staff had to logistically manage the rollout timeline to ensure the City’s compliance with CalRecycle and successful delivery of services by the hauler. In this new phase of compliance, the role of consultants to support limited staffing and serve as a regulatory advocate has been essential in meeting the new demands of SB 1383. 

Moderator

Tracie Bills, SCS Engineers

Plenary Session

Friday, September 9, 2022 at 12:30 PM–1:45 PM Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Grand Coastal

Speakers

Moderator

Loading…